thread cross

Object made typically of two sticks bound together in the shape of a cross, with coloured threads wound around their ends to resemble a cobweb, used in Tibetan magical rituals to entrap evil spirits.

Similar devices have been found in South Africa, Peru, Australia, and Sweden. They vary from simple diamond shapes to complex wheel-or box-shaped combinations reaching 11 ft (3 m) high. They are often highly decorated, with wool, feather, and bits of paper.

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▪ Tibetan Buddhist object
      object usually made of two sticks bound together in the shape of a cross, with coloured threads wound around their ends to resemble a cobweb, used in Tibetan rituals to entrap evil spirits. Similar thread crosses have been encountered in areas bordering Tibet and in South Africa, Peru, Australia, and Sweden.

      In Tibet the thread crosses vary from simple diamond-shaped structures to complex wheel- or box-shaped combinations of structures up to 11 feet (3 metres) high and may be decorated with wool, feathers, and bits of paper according to the purpose and the deity for which they are intended. They are most probably pre-Buddhist in origin but are used by Buddhist priests, also, as a protective device or as a net to catch and destroy unspecified evil spirits. The crosses used in purification ceremonies during the New Year celebrations or for persons suffering from illness or misfortune are broken up and burned.

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Universalium. 2010.

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