skaldic poetry

Oral court poetry originating in Norway but developed chiefly by Icelandic poets (skalds) from the 9th to the 13th century.

Skaldic poetry was contemporary with Eddic poetry (see Edda) but differed from it in metre, diction, and style. Eddic poetry is anonymous, simple, and terse, often taking the form of an objective dramatic dialogue. Skalds were identified by name. Their poems were descriptive, occasional, and subjective, their metres strictly syllabic instead of free and variable, and their language ornamented with similes and metaphors. Formal subjects were the mythical stories engraved on shields, praise of kings, epitaphs, and genealogies.

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▪ medieval literature
skaldic also spelled  Scaldic,  

      oral court poetry originating in Norway but developed chiefly by Icelandic poets (skalds) from the 9th to the 13th century. Skaldic poetry was contemporary with Eddaic poetry but differed from it in metre, diction, and style. Eddaic poetry is anonymous, simple, and terse, often taking the form of an objective dramatic dialogue.

      Skalds were identified by name; their poems were descriptive and subjective; their metres were strictly syllabic instead of free and variable; and their language was ornamented with heiti and kennings. Heiti (“names”) are uncompounded poetic nouns, fanciful art words rather than everyday terms; e.g., “brand” for “sword,” or “steed” for “horse.” Kennings are metaphorical circumlocutions such as “sword liquid” for “blood” or “wave-horse” for “ship.” Sometimes kennings are extremely indirect; for example, “the blue land of Haki” (a sea king) refers not to land but to the sea and requires a knowledge of Norse mythology to be understood.

      Of the 100 skaldic verse forms, the dróttkvætt (court metre), which uses a syllable count and a regular pattern of alliteration, internal rhyme, and assonance, was most popular. The formal subjects of the skalds were shield poems (descriptions of the mythological engravings on shields), praise of kings, epitaphs, and genealogies. There were also less-formal occasional poems, dream songs, magic curses, lampoons, flytings (or poems of abuse), and (although forbidden by law) many love songs. Because they so often praised current feats of the kings, the poems have high historical value, limited only by their abstruse language. The greatest of the skalds was Egill Skallagrímsson (q.v.), whose life and works are preserved in the Egils saga.

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Universalium. 2010.

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