piston and cylinder

In mechanical engineering, a sliding cylinder with a closed head (the piston) that moves up and down (or back and forth) in a slightly larger cylindrical chamber (the cylinder) by or against pressure of a fluid, as in an engine or pump.

The cylinder of a steam engine is closed by plates at both ends, with provision for the piston rod, which is rigidly attached to the piston, to pass through one of the end cover plates. The cylinder of an internal-combustion engine is closed at one end by a plate called the head and open at the other end to permit free oscillation of the connecting rod, which joins the piston to the crankshaft.

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      in mechanical engineering, sliding cylinder with a closed head (the piston) that is moved reciprocally in a slightly larger cylindrical chamber (the cylinder) by or against pressure of a fluid, as in an engine or pump. The cylinder of a steam engine (q.v.) is closed by plates at both ends, with provision for the piston rod, which is rigidly attached to the piston, to pass through one of the end cover plates by means of a gland and stuffing box (steam-tight joint).

      The cylinder of an internal-combustion engine is closed at one end by a plate called the head and open at the other end to permit free oscillation of the connecting rod, which joins the piston to the crankshaft. The cylinder head contains the spark plugs on spark-ignition (gasoline) engines and usually the fuel nozzle on compression-ignition (diesel) engines; on most engines the valves that control the admission of fresh air–fuel mixtures and the escape of burned fuel are also located in the head.

      On most engines the cylinders are smoothly finished holes in the main structural component of the engine that is known as the block, which is generally made of cast iron or aluminum. On some engines the cylinders are lined with sleeves (liners) that can be replaced when they become worn. Aluminum blocks employ centrifugally cast iron liners that are placed in the mold when the aluminum is being cast; these liners are not replaceable, but they can be rebored.

      Pistons are usually equipped with piston rings. These are circular metal rings that fit into grooves in the piston walls and assure a snug fit of the piston inside the cylinder. They help provide a seal to prevent leakage of compressed gases around the piston and to prevent lubricating oil from entering the combustion chamber.

      An important characteristic of an internal-combustion engine is its compression ratio, defined as the total volume of the combustion chamber with the piston fully extended (maximum volume) divided by the total volume with the piston fully compressed (minimum volume). The actual compression ratio in practice is somewhat less. Higher compression ratios usually provide better engine performance, but they require a fuel with better antiknock characteristics.

      Closely associated with the compression ratio is a characteristic known as the displacementi.e., the change in volume (measured in cubic inches or cubic centimetres) of the combustion chamber that takes place as the piston moves from one extreme to the other. The displacement is related to the horsepower rating of an engine.

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Universalium. 2010.

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