most-favoured-nation treatment

Guarantee of same trading opportunities (i.e., tariff concessions) already granted to the most favoured nation (MFN).

It is a method of establishing equal trading opportunities among states by making originally bilateral agreements multilateral. Attempts to guarantee equal trading opportunities were incorporated into commercial treaties as far back as the early 17th century. The Anglo-French treaty signed in 1860 became the model for many later trade agreements, establishing a set of interlocking tariff concessions (see tariff) later extended worldwide by most-favoured-nation treatment. MFN treatment has always applied primarily to the duties charged on imports, but specific provisions have extended the principle to other areas of economic contact, including property rights, patents, and copyrights. See also General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade; reciprocity; World Trade Organization.

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also called  normal trade relations 

      guarantee of trading opportunity equal to that accorded to the most-favoured nation; it is essentially a method of establishing equality of trading opportunity among states by making originally bilateral agreements multilateral. As a principle of public international law, it establishes the sovereign equality of states with respect to trading policy. As an instrument of economic policy, it provides a treaty basis for competitive international transactions.

      In the early 17th century, several commercial treaties incorporated most-favoured-nation provisions. The Anglo-French treaty negotiated in 1860 by Richard Cobden (Cobden, Richard) and Michel Chevalier, which established interlocking tariff concessions that extended most-favoured-nation treatment worldwide, became the model for many later agreements.

      Such treatment has always applied primarily to the duties charged on imports, but specific provisions have extended the most-favoured-nation principle to other areas of international economic contact—for example, the establishment of enterprises of one country's nationals in the territory of the other; navigation in territorial waters; real and personal property rights; intangible property rights such as patents, industrial designs, trademarks, copyrights, and literary property; government purchases; foreign-exchange allocations; and taxation.

      There are two forms of most-favoured-nation treatment: conditional and unconditional. The conditional form grants gratuitously to the contracting party only those concessions originally made gratuitously to a third party and grants concessions originally obtained as part of a bargain only under equivalent conditions or in return for equivalent gains. Under the unconditional form, any tariff concession granted to a third party is granted to the contracting party, a principle that was included in the 1948 General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and in 1995 in the agreement establishing the World Trade Organization (WTO).

      Application of most-favoured-nation treatment was limited in the past by the practice of granting concessions to the principal supplier country in an effort to obtain reciprocal concessions or by reclassifying and minutely defining items in the customs tariff so that a duty concession, while general in form, applies in practice to only one country.

      International concern with most-favoured-nation treatment decreased as new devices of trade regulation (import quotas, exchange control, and state trading) became greater obstacles to trade than tariffs. The discretionary and often arbitrary nature of such regulations rendered any specific guarantee of equal trading opportunity impossible.

      Beginning in the mid-20th century, most-favoured-nation treatment came under concerted attack by the rise of regional economic organizations, such as the European Community (now the European Union), which reduced duties among its members only. Nevertheless, most countries continued to grant most-favoured-nation status to nearly all their trading partners. In 1998 the U.S. government officially adopted the name normal trade relations for most-favoured-nation status, in large part because policy makers were concerned that the term most-favoured nation misled the general public into believing that some countries were granted special trade concessions. The U.S. government's treatment of China as a most-favoured nation stirred controversy in the U.S. Congress until the country was permanently extended normal trade relations by the United States in 2000.

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Universalium. 2010.

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