military unit

Group of a prescribed size with a specific combat role within a larger military organization.

The chief units in the ancient world were the Greek phalanx and the Roman legion. Modern units originated in the 16th–18th century, when professional armies reemerged in Europe after the end of the Middle Ages. Since then the basic units
company, battalion, brigade, and division
have remained in use. The smallest unit today is the squad, which has 7–14 soldiers and is led by a sergeant. Three or four squads make up a platoon, and two or more platoons make up a company, which has 100–250 soldiers and is commanded by a captain or a major. Two or more companies make up a battalion, and several battalions form a brigade. Two or more brigades, along with various specialized battalions, make up a division, which has 7,000–22,000 troops and is commanded by a major general. Two to seven divisions make up an army corps, commanded by a lieutenant general, which with 50,000–300,000 troops is the largest regular army formation, though in wartime two or more corps may be combined to form a field army (commanded by a general), and field armies in turn may be combined to form an army group.

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also called  Unit,  

      a group having a prescribed size and a specific combat or support role within a larger military organization. The chief military units in the ancient classical world were the phalanx (q.v.) of the Greeks and the legion (q.v.) of the Romans. The units used in modern armies have their origins in the 16th–18th centuries, when professional armies reemerged in Europe after the end of the Middle Ages. The basic units of the company, battalion, brigade, and division have been retained since then.

      Armies, navies, and air forces are organized hierarchically into progressively smaller units commanded by officers of progressively lower rank. The prototypical units are those of the army. The smallest unit in an army is the squad, which contains 7 to 14 soldiers and is led by a sergeant. (A slightly larger unit is a section, which consists of 10 to 40 soldiers but is usually used only within headquarters or support organizations.) Three or four squads make up a platoon (q.v.), which has 20 to 50 soldiers and is commanded by a lieutenant. Two or more platoons make up a company (q.v.), which has 100 to 250 soldiers and is commanded by a captain or a major. The function of administration is introduced at this level, in the form of a headquarters platoon administered by a sergeant and containing supply, maintenance, or other sections.

      Two or more companies make up a battalion (q.v.), which has 400 to 1,200 troops and is commanded by a lieutenant colonel. The battalion is the smallest unit to have a staff of officers (in charge of personnel, operations, intelligence, and logistics) to assist the commander. Several battalions form a brigade, which has 2,000 to 8,000 troops and is commanded by a brigadier general or a colonel. (The term regiment [q.v.] can signify either a battalion or a brigade in different countries' armies.) A brigade is the smallest unit to integrate different types of combat and support units into a functional organization. A combat brigade, for example, usually has infantry, armour, artillery, and reconnaissance units.

      Two or more brigades, along with various specialized battalions, make up a division (q.v.), which has 7,000 to 22,000 troops and is commanded by a major general. A division contains all the arms and services needed for the independent conduct of military operations. Two to seven divisions and various support units make up an army corps, or a corps, which has 50,000 to 300,000 troops and is commanded by a lieutenant general. The army corps is the largest regular army formation, though in wartime two or more corps may be combined to form a field army (commanded by a general), and field armies in turn may be combined to form an army group.

      Naval (navy) units follow somewhat more flexible organizational guidelines. Administratively, several ships of the same type (e.g., destroyers) are organized into a squadron. Several squadrons in turn form a flotilla, several of which in turn form a fleet. For operations, however, many navies organize their vessels into task units (3–5 ships), task or battle groups (4–10 ships), task forces (2–5 task groups), and fleets (several task forces).

      The basic fighting unit in an air force is the squadron, which consists of several aircraft of the same type—e.g., fighters, and often of the same model—e.g., F-16s. Three to six flying squadrons and their support squadrons make up a wing. (An intermediate unit between the squadron and the wing is the air group or group, which consists of two to four squadrons.) Several wings are sometimes combined to form an air division or an air force.

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Universalium. 2010.

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