intestinal gas

Volatile material (mostly swallowed air, partly digestive by-products) in the digestive tract, which normally contains 150–500 cc of gas.

Air in the stomach is either belched out or passed to the intestines. Some of its oxygen is absorbed into the blood along the way. Carbon dioxide produced by digestion is added. Nitrogen, the major component, is inert and usually passed on. Obstructions in the small intestine can trap gas in distended pockets, causing severe pain. In the large intestine, bacterial fermentation products are added
mostly hydrogen but also methane, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and sulfur-containing mercaptans. Excess gas in the colon is eventually expelled from the body.

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also called  flatus 

      material contained within the digestive tract that consists principally of swallowed air and partly of by-products of digestion. In humans the digestive tract contains normally between 150 and 500 cubic cm (10 and 30 cubic inches) of gas. During eating, air is swallowed into the stomach; this is either eructated (belched) or passed on to the intestines.

      Gas in the stomach contains approximately 15 to 16 percent oxygen and 5 to 9 percent carbon dioxide; the rest is nitrogen. The air that is breathed contains about 21 percent oxygen; thus, some of the swallowed oxygen is absorbed by the blood capillaries in the stomach. Carbon dioxide is formed by reduction of the food by the stomach's gastric juices. Nitrogen is not absorbed as a gas and is usually passed on.

      The small intestine absorbs some of the carbon dioxide and oxygen and rapidly passes the remaining gas to the large intestine. If obstructions occur in the small intestine, gas pockets can accumulate containing as much as 3,500 cubic cm (200 cubic inches) of gas. These pockets distend the small intestine, causing severe pain. Normally, gas passes through the small intestine with the regular intestinal movements.

      In the large intestine, or colon, the gas volume is usually 100 to 200 cubic cm (6 to 12 cubic inches). Most of the oxygen has been removed, and the amount of carbon dioxide has increased. New gases formed from bacterial fermentation are added in the colon. Of the new gases produced, hydrogen is the major component. Some of this is absorbed by the blood and released through the lungs during breathing. Other gas products formed are methane, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and various sulfur-containing mercaptans. Excess gas in the colon is eventually passed from the body by a process known as flatulence. Certain foods, such as beans, pork, onions, cabbage, and cauliflower, are known to increase gas production because of their high sulfur content.

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Universalium. 2010.

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