calcium deficiency

Inadequate supply or metabolism of calcium, the main structural element of bones and teeth.

Its metabolism is regulated by vitamin D, phosphorus, and hormones (see parathyroid gland). Calcium in the blood has roles in muscle contraction, nerve-impulse transmission, blood clotting, milk production, hormone secretion, and enzyme function, for which calcium is pulled from the bones if deficiency develops. Chronic deficiency may be a factor in the development of osteoporosis or osteomalacia (softening of bone) and may contribute to hypertension and colon cancer. Severe calcium deficiency (hypocalcemia), usually the result of a metabolic problem rather than a dietary deficiency, causes numbness, tingling, and painful muscle aches and spasms.

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 condition in which calcium is insufficient or is not utilized properly. Calcium is the mineral that is most likely to be deficient in the average diet. It is the chief supportive element in bones and teeth. Calcium salts make up about 70 percent of bone by weight and give that substance its strength and rigidity. About 99 percent of the calcium in the human body is held in the bones and teeth. The remaining 1 percent circulates in the bloodstream, where it performs a variety of important functions. It helps to contract muscles and to regulate the contractions of the heart. It plays a role in the transmission of nerve impulses and in the clotting of blood. Calcium is involved in the stimulation of contractions of the uterus during childbirth and in the production of milk. It also regulates the secretion of various hormones and aids in the functioning of various enzymes within the body.

      Ingested calcium is absorbed in the small intestine and passes from there into the bloodstream, most of it ultimately reaching the bones and teeth. The most efficient absorption of calcium is dependent on the presence in the body of vitamin D, which is a key ingredient in various hormones that enable calcium to pass from the digestive system into the blood, bones, and teeth. Similarly, there are optimal ratios of phosphorus to the amount of calcium consumed that permit calcium to be more completely utilized. Hormonal secretions of the parathyroid (parathyroid gland) and thyroid (thyroid gland) glands (parathyroid hormone and calcitonin, respectively) also help maintain a calcium equilibrium in the blood. These regulatory mechanisms help to prevent a deficiency in calcium from developing in the bloodstream. When such a deficiency does develop, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D act to transfer calcium from the bones in order to maintain the mineral's all-important presence in the bloodstream. The result of a mild insufficiency of calcium over the long term may be a factor in osteoporosis, a disease characterized by thinning of the bones. Faulty metabolism of calcium during childhood may result in rickets. Recent research points to calcium deficiency as being a possible cause of hypertension (high blood pressure) and of colorectal cancer.

      Severe calcium deficiency, or hypocalcemia, which is defined as a reduction of calcium levels in the bloodstream below a certain normal range, has its own clinical manifestations. The main syndrome is tetany, which involves sensations of numbness and tingling around the mouth and fingertips and painful aches and spasms of the muscles. These symptoms respond to treatment with calcium. A clinically detectable deficiency of calcium is a relatively rare finding and is almost always caused by a deficiency of either parathyroid hormone or vitamin D in the body, i.e., the two chief regulators of calcium metabolism.

      Calcium is plentiful in nature. Food sources high in calcium include milk, cheese, yogurt, and other dairy products; leafy green vegetables such as broccoli, turnips, and collard greens; and seafood such as salmon and sardines.

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Universalium. 2010.

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