Wannsee Conference

(Jan. 20, 1942) Meeting of Nazi officials in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee to plan the "final solution" to the "Jewish question.

" It was attended by 15 Nazi senior bureaucrats led by Reinhard Heydrich, head of the SS and Gestapo, and included Adolf Eichmann, chief of Jewish affairs for the Reich Central Security Office. It marked a turning point in Nazi policy toward the Jews. An earlier idea, to deport all of Europe's Jews to Madagascar, was abandoned as impractical in wartime. Instead, the newly planned final solution would entail rounding up all Jews throughout Europe, transporting them eastward, and organizing them into labour gangs. The final protocol of the Wannsee Conference never explicitly mentioned extermination, but, within a few months after the meeting, the first gas chambers were installed at Auschwitz and Treblinka. See also Holocaust.

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Germany [1942]
      meeting of Nazi (Nazi Party) officials on January 20, 1942, in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee to plan the “final solution” (Endlösung) to the so-called “Jewish question” (Judenfrage). On July 31, 1941, Nazi leader Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring (Göring, Hermann) had issued orders to Reinhard Heydrich (Heydrich, Reinhard), SS (Nazi paramilitary corps) leader and Gestapo (Secret Police) chief, to prepare a comprehensive plan for this “final solution.” The Wannsee Conference, held six months later, was attended by 15 Nazi senior bureaucrats led by Heydrich and including Adolf Eichmann (Eichmann, Adolf), chief of Jewish affairs for the Reich Central Security Office.

      The conference marked a turning point in Nazi policy toward the Jews. An earlier idea, to deport all of Europe's Jews to the island of Madagascar, off of Africa, was abandoned as impractical in wartime. Instead, the newly planned final solution would entail rounding up all Jews throughout Europe, transporting them eastward, and organizing them into labour gangs. The work and living conditions would be sufficiently hard as to fell large numbers by “natural diminution”; those that survived would be “treated accordingly.”

      The men seated at the table were among the elite of the Reich. More than half of them held doctorates from German universities. They were well informed about the policy toward Jews. Each understood that the cooperation of his agency was vital if such an ambitious, unprecedented policy was to succeed.

      Among the agencies represented were the Department of Justice, the Foreign Ministry, the Gestapo, the SS, the Race and Resettlement Office, and the office in charge of distributing Jewish property. Also at the meeting was a representative of the General Government, the Polish occupation administration, whose territory included more than 2 million Jews. The head of Heydrich's office for Jewish affairs, Adolf Eichmann, prepared the conference notes.

      Heydrich himself introduced the agenda:

Another possible solution of the [Jewish] problem has now taken the place of emigration—i.e., evacuation of the Jews to the east…Such activities are, however, to be considered as provisional actions, but practical experience is already being collected which is of greatest importance in relation to the future final solution of the Jewish problem.

      The men needed little explanation. They understood that “evacuation to the east” was a euphemism for concentration camps and that the “final solution” was to be the systematic murder of Europe's Jews, which is now known as the Holocaust. The final protocol of the Wannsee Conference never explicitly mentioned extermination, but, within a few months after the meeting, the Nazis installed the first poison-gas chambers in Poland in what came to be called extermination camps (extermination camp). Responsibility for the entire project was put in the hands of Heinrich Himmler (Himmler, Heinrich) and his SS and Gestapo.

Michael Berenbaum
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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