Verghina

or Vergina

Archaeological site and ancient capital of Macedonia, northern Greece.

Built on a site in use from the Stone Age, it was first called Balla. The palace of Palatista, partly destroyed by fire, dates from the reign of Antigonus III Doson (с 263–221 BC). An Iron Age cemetery that dates from the 10th–7th centuries BC is near the palace. The 4th-century-BC royal tomb of Philip II of Macedon also is at Verghina.

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▪ archaeological site, Greece
also spelled  Vergina,  

      archaeological site and ancient capital of Macedonia in Imathía nomós (department), northern Greece. It is situated on a plateau 47 miles (75 km) southwest of Thessaloníki, at the eastern foot of the Vermion Mountains, on the southern edge of the Haliakmon plain. Surrounded by oak and beech forests, it is named after a legendary queen of ancient Beroea (present Véroia, capital of the nomós). Verghina was built on a city site from the Stone Age and was first called Balla. The palace of Palatista, partly destroyed by fire, dates from the reign of Antigonus Gonates III (c. 263–221 BC), who defeated Cleomenes III, king of Sparta (died c. 219 BC). Near the palace there is an Iron Age cemetery that dates from the 10th to 7th centuries BC. Most of the early royal tombs in Macedonia are intricate subterranean structures built of limestone, usually with a vaulted roof. The later temple tomb of the 3rd century is constructed of marble and limestone. A Macedonian necropolis at Verghina contained objects such as silver jewelry, gold and iron swords, bronze ornaments, brooches in geometric shapes, and various weapons.

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Universalium. 2010.

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