Széchenyi, István, Count

born Sept. 21, 1791, Vienna, Austrian Empire
died April 8, 1860, Döbling, near Vienna

Hungarian reformer and writer.

Born to an aristocratic Hungarian family, he fought against Napoleon and then traveled extensively in Europe. He returned to Budapest to found the Hungarian National Academy of Sciences (1825) and wrote several works that called for economic reforms and urged the nobility to pay taxes to modernize Hungary. He led projects that improved roads, made the Danube River navigable to the Black Sea, and built the first suspension bridge at Budapest. In the 1840s he lost his following to the more radical Kossuth Lajos. Entering the cabinet in 1848, Széchenyi lost his sanity when conflict with Vienna erupted; he was removed to an asylum near Vienna and later committed suicide.

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▪ Hungarian political reformer and writer
(Gróf)
born Sept. 21, 1791, Vienna, Austrian Empire
died April 8, 1860, Döbling, near Vienna

      reformer and writer whose practical enterprises represented an effort toward Hungarian national development before the upsurge of revolutionary radicalism in the 1840s.

      Born into an old, aristocratic Hungarian family, Széchenyi fought against Napoleon I and thereafter traveled extensively in Europe. The modernity of England and France impressed him, especially when he contrasted them with his backward homeland. Resolved to improve Hungary's condition, he donated a year's income to establish the Hungarian National Academy of Sciences (1825). At Széchenyi's instigation, the Hungarian nobility formed aristocratic clubs to discuss political affairs. In 1830 he introduced steam shipping on the Danube. Also in that year, he began publishing a number of works, including Hitel (1830; “Credit”), Vilag (1831; “Light”), and Stadium (1833), in which he voiced Hungary's need for economic advancement. Széchenyi argued that the nobility was responsible for a large portion of the country's evils; modernization was impossible if the aristocracy paid no taxes and wasted its time in complacency, frivolity, and the defense of the Hungarian constitution against Vienna. Hungary's nobility was scandalized, but Széchenyi's polemics were effective. Though he failed to better the lot of the peasant, he constructed roads, improved the navigability of the Danube River so that ships could travel all the way to the Black Sea, and built the first suspension bridge at Budapest, financed through tolls paid by both nobles and commoners.

      In the 1840s, however, Széchenyi lost much of his following to the more radical younger generation under Lajos Kossuth (Kossuth, Lajos). Loyal to the Habsburgs, Széchenyi condemned the attempt to Magyarize Hungary's non-Magyars; he believed that liberty would follow economic progress, whereas Kossuth argued the reverse. Entering Lajos Batthyány's cabinet in 1848, Széchenyi lost his sanity when conflict with Vienna erupted; he was removed to an asylum near Vienna. Threatened with prosecution for sedition after he published an attack on Austria's absolutist rule in Hungary (1859), he committed suicide the next year.

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Universalium. 2010.

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