Schlegel, Friedrich von

born March 10, 1772, Hannover, Hanover
died Jan. 12, 1829, Dresden, Saxony

German writer and critic.

He contributed many of his projects and theories to journals such as Athenäum (1798–1800), the quarterly he and his brother August Wilhelm von Schlegel founded at Jena. His study of Sanskrit led him to publish Concerning the Language and Wisdom of India (1808), a pioneering attempt at comparative Indo-European linguistics and the starting point of the study of Indo-Aryan languages and comparative philology. His conception of a universal, historical, and comparative literary scholarship has been profoundly influential, and he is regarded as the originator of many of the philosophical ideas that inspired early German Romanticism.

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▪ German writer
born March 10, 1772, Hannover, Hanover
died Jan. 12, 1829, Dresden, Saxony

      German writer and critic, originator of many of the philosophical ideas that inspired the early German Romantic movement. Open to every new idea, he reveals a rich store of projects and theories in his provocative Aperçus and Fragmente (contributed to the Athenäum and other journals); his conception of a universal, historical, and comparative literary scholarship has had profound influence.

      Schlegel was a nephew of the author Johann Elias Schlegel (Schlegel, Johann Elias). After studying at Göttingen and Leipzig, he became closely associated with his elder brother August Wilhelm Schlegel (Schlegel, August Wilhelm von) at Jena in the quarterly Athenäum. He believed that Greek philosophy and culture were essential to complete education. Influenced also by J.G. Fichte (Fichte, Johann Gottlieb)'s transcendental philosophy, he developed his conception of the Romantic—that poetry should be at once philosophical and mythological, ironic and religious. But his imaginative work, a semi-autobiographical novel fragment Lucinde (1799; Eng. trans., 1913–15), and a tragedy Alarcos (1802) were less successful.

      In 1801 Schlegel was briefly lecturer at Jena University, but in 1802 he went to Paris with Dorothea Veit, the eldest daughter of Moses Mendelssohn and the divorced wife of Simon Veit. He married her in 1804. In Paris he studied Sanskrit, publishing Über die Sprache und Weisheit der Indier (1808), the first attempt at comparative Indo-Germanic linguistics and the starting point of the study of Indian languages and comparative philology. In 1808 he and his wife became Roman Catholics, and he united his concept of Romanticism with ideas of medieval Christendom. He became the ideological spokesman of the anti-Napoleonic movement for German liberation, serving in the Vienna chancellery (1809) and helping to write the appeal to the German people issued by the archduke Charles. He had already edited two periodicals on the arts, Europa and Deutsches Museum; in 1820 he became editor of the right-wing Catholic paper Concordia, and his attack in it on the beliefs that he had earlier cherished led to a breach with his brother.

      Two series of lectures Schlegel gave in Vienna between 1810 and 1812 (Über die neuere Geschichte, 1811; A Course of Lectures on Modern History, 1849 and Geschichte der alten und neueren Literatur, 1815; Lectures on the History of Literature, 1818) developed his concept of a “new Middle Ages.” His collected works were first issued in 10 volumes in 1822–25, augmented to 15 volumes in 1846. His correspondence with his brother was published in 1890 and that with Dorothea was edited (1926) by J. Körner, who wrote major studies of the brothers.

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Universalium. 2010.

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