Romains, Jules

orig. Louis-Henri-Jean Farigoule

born Aug. 26, 1885, Saint-Julien-Chapteuil, France
died Aug. 14, 1972, Paris

French novelist, dramatist, and poet.

A teacher of philosophy, Romains first became known as a poet and as founder (с 1908–11), with Georges Chennevière, of the literary movement Unanimisme, which combined belief in universal brotherhood with the psychological concept of group consciousness. His most popular work was the comedy Knock (1923), a satire on doctors. His masterpiece, Men of Good Will, 27 vol. (1932–46), is a vast novel cycle attempting to recreate the spirit of French society from 1908 to 1933 and exemplifying the Unanimiste interest in collective life.

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▪ French author
pseudonym of  Louis-henri-jean Farigoule  
born Aug. 26, 1885, Saint-Julien-Chapteuil, Fr.
died Aug. 14, 1972, Paris
 French novelist, dramatist, poet, a founder of the literary movement known as Unanimisme, and author of two internationally known works—a comedy, Knock, and the novel cycle Les Hommes de bonne volonté (Men of Good Will).

      Romains studied science and philosophy at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. After teaching philosophy he decided in 1919 to devote his time to writing. In 1940, when the Germans occupied France, he took refuge in the United States and remained there until the end of the war. In 1946 he was elected to the Académie Française.

      Before World War I, Romains was known primarily as a poet and as founder (c. 1908–11), with the poet Georges Chennevière (1884–1929), of Unanimisme (Unanimism), a movement that combined belief in universal brotherhood with the psychological concept of group consciousness. It emphasized the transcendent power of collective emotion and the life of a human world—such as a village, factory, or school—as a whole, rather than of the individuals composing it. His first notable book of poems, La Vie unanime (1908), was published by the Abbaye, a community of artists and writers led by Georges Duhamel and Charles Vildrac with which Romains was closely connected. His first plays, produced by Jacques Copeau at the Théâtre du Vieux-Colombier, were Unanimiste verse dramas.

      Romains's most popular work was the comedy Knock, ou le triomphe de la médecine (1923; Dr. Knock, 1925), a satire in the tradition of Molière on the power of doctors to impose upon human credulity. The character of Dr. Knock, whose long and serious face, scientific double-talk, ominous pauses, and frightening graphs and charts convert a group of robust villagers into confirmed hypochondriacs, was created on the stage by the noted actor-producer Louis Jouvet. It was made into a film, Dr. Knock (1932), starring Jouvet.

      Romains, in his first important collective novel, Mort de quelqu'un (1911), described the reactions of a group of people to the death of an insignificant member of society. Les Copains (1913), a farcical tale told with Rabelaisian truculence, evokes the bonds that unite seven friends who are determined to shock communities with their practical jokes.

      His masterpiece is the vast cyclic epic Les Hommes de bonne volonté (27 vol., 1932–46; Men of Good Will, 14 vol., 1933–46), an attempt to recreate the spirit of a whole era of French society from Oct. 6, 1908, to Oct. 7, 1933. There is no central figure or family to provide a focus for the narrative, and the work is populated by a huge cast of characters. The action presents, successively, historical events (Verdun, 1938), domestic scenes (Éros de Paris, 1932), and crimes treated in the manner of a detective story (Le Crime de Quinette, 1932). The finest sections, portrayals of collective life and emotion—the frescoes of Paris in the fall of 1908, when the series opens, and the victory parade after World War I—exemplify the Unanimiste method at its best. The two Verdun volumes at the centre of the work are remarkable visions of the soul of a world at war. The “men of good will” are the decent, humane people, men and women with a respect for other people's ideas and a sense of humour, who, often unheeded and groping in the dark, strive for freedom.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Romains, Jules — ► (1885 1972) Seudónimo de Louis Farigoule, escritor francés. Autor del ciclo novelesco Los hombres de buena voluntad (1932 43). * * * orig. Louis Henri Jean Farigoule (26 ago. 1885, Saint Julien Chapteuil, Francia–14 ago. 1972, París). Novelista …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Romains, Jules — (1885 1972) (Louis Farigoule)    writer    Jules Romains (the pseudonym of Louis Farigoule), a leader of the unanimist movement, was born in Saint Julien Chapteuil, Haute Loire, and educated in Paris at the École normale supérieure. He taught… …   France. A reference guide from Renaissance to the Present

  • Romains, Jules — pseud. di Farigoule, Louis …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • Romains — Romains, Jules …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Jules Romains — Fotografía de Jules Romains, tomada por Carl van Vechten en 1936 Nombre completo Louis Henri Jean Farigoule …   Wikipedia Español

  • Jules Romains —  Pour l’article homophone, voir Jules Romain. Jules Romains Jules Romains (1936) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Jules Romain — Portrait Romains (1936) von Carl van Vechten Jules Romains, mit bürgerlichem Namen Louis Henri Farigoule (* 26. August 1885 in La Chapuze, heute Saint Julien Chapteuil; † 14. August 1972 in Paris), war ein französischer Romancier …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Romains — Portrait Romains (1936) von Carl van Vechten Jules Romains, mit bürgerlichem Namen Louis Henri Farigoule (* 26. August 1885 in La Chapuze, heute Saint Julien Chapteuil; † 14. August 1972 in Paris), war ein französischer Romancier …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Jules — /joohlz/; Fr. /zhyuul/, n. a male given name, French form of Julius. * * * (as used in expressions) Ayer Sir Alfred Jules Bordet Jules Jean Baptiste–Vincent Dubos René Jules Dumont d Urville Jules Sébastien César Feiffer Jules Ferry Jules… …   Universalium

  • Jules — (as used in expressions) Ayer, Sir A(lfred) J(ules) Bordet, Jules (Jean Baptiste Vincent) Dubos, René (Jules) Dumont d Urville, Jules (Sébastien César) Feiffer, Jules Ferry, Jules (François Camille) Feydeau, Georges (Léon Jules Marie) Goncourt,… …   Enciclopedia Universal

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