Ossianic ballads

Irish Gaelic and Scottish lyric and narrative poems dealing with the legendary Finn MacCumhaill and his war band.

They are named for Oisín (Ossian), the chief bard of the Fenian cycle. Part of a common Scots-Irish Gaelic tradition, the ballads consist of more than 80,000 lines dating from the 11th to the 18th century. Unlike earlier Fenian literature, which reflected mutual respect between pagan and Christian tradition, they are stubbornly pagan and anticlerical, full of lament for past glories and contempt for the Christian present. Most of the poetry claimed for Oisín was in fact written by Scottish poet James Macpherson (1736–1796).

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      Irish lyric and narrative poems dealing with the legends of Finn MacCumhaill and his war band. They are named for Oisín (Ossian), the chief bard of the Fenian cycle. These poems belong to a common Scots-Irish tradition: some are found in the Scottish Highlands, others in Ireland, but their subjects are of Irish origin. Consisting of over 80,000 lines, they were formed from the 11th to the 18th century, although their themes of pursuits and rescues, monster slayings, internecine strife, elopements, and magic visitors go back to an earlier period (c. 3rd century AD). The tone of the Ossianic ballads is strikingly different from the earlier Fenian literature, which reflected a mutual respect between pagan and Christian tradition. The Ossianic ballads, usually introduced by a dialogue between Oisín and Patrick, are stubbornly pagan and anticlerical, full of lament for the glories of the past and contempt for the Christian present. St. Patrick is often portrayed as a bigoted cleric. The earliest collection of these late ballads was made by Sir James MacGregor between 1512 and 1526 and is known as The Book of the Dean of Lismore.

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Universalium. 2010.

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