Megarian school

or Megarics
School of philosophy founded in Greece in the early 4th century BC by Eucleides of Megara

died с 380 BC

.

It is noted more for its criticism of Aristotle and its influence on Stoic logic (see Stoicism) than for its doctrines. Among Eucleides' successors was Eubulides of Miletus, who criticized Aristotle's doctrines of categories, movement, and potentiality. Other Megarians were Diodorus Cronus (fl. 4th century BC) and Stilpo (fl.с 380–300 BC); Stilpo taught Zeno of Citium, and Menedemus (339?–c. 265 BC). The school died out at the beginning of the 3rd century BC.

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      school of philosophy founded in Greece at the beginning of the 4th century BC by Eucleides of Megara. It is noted more for its criticism of Aristotle and its influence upon Stoic logic than for any positive assertions. Although Eucleides was a pupil of Socrates and the author of Socratic dialogues, only imperfect glimpses of his thought survive. He is said to have held that “the good is one, though it is called by many names, sometimes wisdom, sometimes God, and sometimes reason” and that “the contrary to the good has no reality.”

      The Megarians, at least under Eucleides, had an ethical and educational purpose, and it was in this spirit that they defended the unity of goodness. They were, nevertheless, men of theory, as compared with other self-styled followers of Socrates, such as the Cyrenaics and Cynics. The Megarians consciously cultivated dialectical skills, and it was the Socratic method of questions and answers, rather than any positive doctrine, that linked them together. After Eucleides' death (c. 380 BC), practical and dialectical interests diminished; one wing of the school propounded and studied paradoxes in the manner of Zeno and otherwise approached an independent treatment of logic.

      Among Eucleides' successors was Eubulides of Miletus, who took the lead in Megarian criticism of Aristotle's doctrine of categories, his definition of (and belief in) movement, and his concept of potentiality. (For Megarians, only what is now actual is possible.) Some passages in Aristotle's writings are probably retorts to Megarian criticism. Whereas Aristotelian logic was applicable to predicates (noun expressions) or classes, the Megarians specialized in a logic of whole propositions.

      Other Megarians were Diodorus Cronus and Stilpon (Stilpōn), a representative of the older tradition inasmuch as he subordinated dialectic to a moral purpose. He taught the Stoic Zeno of Citium, and Menedemus, leader of the Eretrian school. The Megarian school died out at the beginning of the 3rd century BC.

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Universalium. 2010.

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