Maximus the Greek

born 1480, Árta, Greece
died 1556, near Moscow, Russia; feast day January 21

Greek scholar and linguist.

Educated in Paris, Venice, and Florence, he became part of a circle of humanist scholars and was influenced by the Dominican reformer Girolamo Savonarola. He became a Greek Orthodox monk and was chosen to translate Greek liturgical and theological texts into Russian, thus making possible the dissemination of Byzantine culture throughout Russia. In Moscow he became involved in a religious controversy when he joined a faction called the Nonpossessors, who advocated renunciation of property ownership by the church. Arrested for heresy in 1525, he was imprisoned for 20 years in a monastery. After his death he was venerated as a saint.

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▪ Greek Orthodox monk and scholar
also called  Maximus The Hagiorite  
born 1480, Árta, Greece
died 1556, near Moscow

      Greek Orthodox monk, Humanist scholar, and linguist, whose principal role in the translation of the Scriptures and philosophical–theological literature into the Russian language made possible the dissemination of Byzantine culture throughout Russia.

      Maximus was educated in Paris, Venice, and Florence. A friend of prominent Humanist scholars and editors in Italy, he was later influenced by the ascetical reformer Girolamo Savonarola of the Dominican Order in Florence. So great was his reputation as a scholar that when the Russian Church requested from the patriarchate of Constantinople an expert to correct church texts that were used in Russia, Maximus was chosen for the mission. In Moscow, with the assistance of Russian secretaries, he translated original Greek canonical, liturgical, and theological texts into the Russian language. The great literary output inspired a Slavic cultural movement and laid the groundwork for later Russian theology.

      While in Moscow Maximus became involved in the factional controversy that disturbed the Russian Church throughout most of the 16th century. This was between the Nonpossessors (or Transvolgans), who believed that monasteries should not own property and who had liberal political views, and the Possessors (or Josephites), who held opposite opinions on monastic property and strongly supported the monarchy, including its autocratic aspects. The Nonpossessors came to be led by Maximus, the Possessors by Joseph of Volokolamsk. Among his many activities, Maximus took part in the preparation of a corrected and critical edition of the Kormchaya kniga, a Slavic version of the Byzantine ecclesiastical laws collected as the Nomocanon. In this work, he supported the ideas of the Nonpossessors, holding that the Church should practice poverty and desist from feudal exploitation of the peasantry. In 1525 Maximus was arrested on the charge of heresy by Daniel, metropolitan of Moscow and a Possessor. After a series of trials, he was condemned in 1531 and imprisoned for 20 years in the monastery of Volokolamsk, near Moscow, of which Joseph was abbot. While in detention, Maximus continued to produce theological works. When he emerged in 1551, his personal prestige was immense. Tsar Ivan IV the Terrible paid him public honour, but his political views were suppressed. During the last five years of his life, he retired to the Troitse-Sergiyeva Monastery, where he was buried and was subsequently venerated as a saint.

      Among the written works credited to him are commentaries on the Psalms and on the Acts of the Apostles and an anti-Latin church treatise entitled “Eulogy for the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul.” The “Eulogy” includes a criticism of Western Christianity for fostering the doctrine of the existence of purgatory, a belief in a requisite period of spiritual cleansing after death to enable union with God.

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Universalium. 2010.

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