Marino, Giambattista

born Oct. 18, 1569, Naples
died March 25, 1625, Naples

Italian poet, founder of the school of Marinism (later secentismo), which dominated 17th-century Italian poetry.

Trained as a lawyer, Marino chose not to practice and instead found immense success with poetry that he managed to get published despite censorship. His most important work, a labour of 20 years, is Adonis (1623), an enormous poem (45,000 lines) that relates, with many digressions, the love story of Venus and Adonis. His work, praised throughout Europe, far surpassed that of his imitators, who carried his complicated wordplay and elaborate conceits and metaphors to such extremes that Marinism became a pejorative term.

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▪ Italian poet
Marino also spelled  Marini  
born Oct. 18, 1569, Naples
died March 25, 1625, Naples

      Italian poet, founder of the school of Marinism (later Secentismo), which dominated 17th-century Italian poetry. Marino's own work, praised throughout Europe, far surpassed that of his imitators, who carried his complicated word play and elaborate conceits and metaphors to such extremes that Marinism became a pejorative term. His work was translated all over Europe.

      Marino trained for the law because of parental pressure but refused to practice his profession. His life after 1590 consisted of wild living, wandering between Italian and French courts, frequent money problems, brushes with the law, and immense success with the poetry that he managed to get published despite censorship. Much of his early work was circulated, with great acclaim, in manuscript and published later in his life. In 1596 he wrote La sampogna (“The Syrinx”), a series of sensual idylls using mythological and pastoral subjects, but he was unable to publish it until 1620.

      After serving for a while as secretary to a Neapolitan prince, Marino was arrested in 1598 and 1600 for immorality, each time obtaining release through powerful admirers. He went to Rome and attached himself to Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, a nephew of the Pope. Together they visited several Italian cities. Marino tried to publish some of his voluptuous poems in Parma but was halted by the Inquisition. Finally he was able to publish his early poetry as Le rime (1602; “The Rhymes”) and under the title La lira, 2 vol. (1608 and 1614; “The Lyre”).

      At Torino (Turin) from 1608 to 1615 he enjoyed the patronage of the duke of Savoy but was resented for his satirical poems against a rival poet, Gaspare Murtola (La Murtoleide, 1619; “The Murtoliad”). Murtola had him imprisoned for this offense and others; and, though his friends secured his release, Marino left Torino for Paris in 1615, where he stayed until 1623 under the patronage of Marie de Médicis and Louis XIII.

      Before leaving Paris Marino published his most important work, a labour of 20 years, Adone (1623; definitive ed. by R. Balsamo-Crivelli, 1922; Adonis [selections]). Adone, an enormous poem (45,000 lines), relates, with many digressions, the love story of Venus and Adonis and shows the best and worst of Marino's style. The best is found in brilliant passages, written in a masterly style; the worst, in excessive conceits and metaphors, word play, and hyperbole. On returning to Italy in 1623, Marino encountered new difficulties with censorship, but he stayed in Naples until his death.

      Other works for which Marino is remembered are La galeria (1620; “The Gallery”), an attempt to recreate works of art poetically, and La strage degli innocenti (1632; The Slaughter of the Innocents). His correspondence was published as Lettere (“Letters”) in 1627.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Marino, Giambattista — ► (1569 1625) Poeta barroco italiano. Su poesía revolucionó las formas y conceptos establecidos hasta en tonces. Autor de Adonis (1623). (V. marinismo.) * * * (18 oct. 1569, Nápoles–25 mar. 1625, Nápoles). Poeta italiano, fundador del marinismo… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Giambattista Marino — Giambattista Marino, auch Giovan(ni) Battista Marino (* 18. Oktober 1569 in Neapel; † 25. März 1625 in Neapel) war ein italienischer Dichter der Barockzeit. Inhaltsverzeichnis …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Giambattista Marino — Giambattista Marino. Giambattista Marino (18 de octubre de 1569, Nápoles 26 de marzo de 1625, Nápoles), poeta italiano, fundador del estilo llamado Marinismo, después secentismo, caracterizado por un empleo extravagante y excesivo de conceptos ,… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Giambattista Marini — Giambattista Marino Pour les articles homonymes, voir Marino. Giambattista Marino Autres noms Cavalier Marin Activité(s) …   Wikipédia en Français

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  • Marino — (Del lat. marinus.) ► adjetivo 1 Del mar: ■ lo que más le gusta de la playa es la brisa marina . SINÓNIMO marítimo 2 HERÁLDICA Se aplica al animal fabuloso que tiene cola de pez como las sirenas. ► sustantivo masculino 3 NÁUTICA, OFICIOS Y… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Giambattista — (as used in expressions) Bodoni Giambattista Marino Giambattista Giambattista Piazzetta Giambattista Piranesi Giambattista Tiepolo Vico Giambattista * * * …   Universalium

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  • Marino — (as used in expressions) Marini Marino Marino Daniel Constantine Jr. Marino Giambattista San Marino Republic of San Marino * * * ▪ Italy       town, Lazio (Latium) region, central Italy, in the Colli Albani (Alban Hills) near Lago (lake) Albano,… …   Universalium

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