London, University of

Federation of more than 50 British institutions of higher learning, located primarily in London, England.

It was established by liberals and religious dissenters in 1828, and it accepted for enrollment Roman Catholics, Jews, and other non-Anglicans. The first two colleges were University College and King's College. From 1849 a student enrolled in any university in the British Empire could be awarded a University of London degree after examination. By the early 20th century many institutions had become affiliated with the university, including Bedford College, the first British university to grant degrees to women; the London School of Economics and Political Science, now an internationally renowned centre for the social sciences; and three other institutions that later became the Imperial College of Science and Technology.

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      federation of British institutions of higher learning, located primarily in London, that includes 19 virtually autonomous colleges, 10 separate institutes known collectively as the School of Advanced Study, an institute in Paris, and a marine biological station. The university also examines and grants degrees to students not enrolled in any of its constituent schools.

      The university was a product of the Liberal movement of the 19th century. Following a call by poet Thomas Campbell in 1825 for a university to provide education for the class between the “mechanics” and the “enormously rich,” liberals and religious dissenters founded London University (now University College) in 1826; instruction began in 1828. Its application for a royal charter was refused because the college admitted Roman Catholics, Jews, and other non-Anglicans. In 1829 King's College was founded under Anglican auspices, but its charter was blocked by the dissenters. In 1836 the University of London was created as an administrative entity that would hold no classes of its own but would examine and confer degrees on students of the other two colleges. Under the Supplemental Charter of 1849, it became possible for students enrolled in any institution of higher learning anywhere in the British Empire to be examined by the university and awarded a University of London degree. Students from institutions as different as the University of Oxford and the Working Men's College of London thereby could become recipients of London degrees. In 1858 students who were not enrolled in any institution were allowed to become degree candidates. The first female students were admitted in 1878.

      By the early 20th century many other institutions had become affiliated with the university, including the London School of Economics and Political Science, founded in 1895 and now an internationally respected centre for the study of social science; the expansive Institute of Education, founded in 1902; and the highly respected School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), founded in 1916.

      In 1900 the university was authorized to begin offering its own courses. Students attending the university or its affiliated schools were dubbed “internal students”; those who sat for university examinations but were enrolled elsewhere were “external students.” During World War II, most of the city's colleges were temporarily moved elsewhere in the United Kingdom, and the Senate House—the university's administrative building—was occupied by the Ministry of Information. Enrollment expanded significantly in the 1960s and '70s because of the increased number of residents pursuing higher education. During the 1990s, individual colleges became more autonomous and took on many of the university's central administrative duties. In May 2008 it was announced that the university would open a department in Adelaide, South Australia, specializing in energy and resource management.

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Universalium. 2010.

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