Lexington and Concord, Battles of

(April 19, 1775) Initial skirmishes between British soldiers and American colonists that marked the beginning of the American Revolution.

En route from Boston to seize the colonists' military stores at Concord, Mass., the British force of 700 was met at Lexington by 77 local minutemen (see minuteman) alerted by Paul Revere and others. Which side fired the first shot is unclear, and resistance soon ended. The British moved on to nearby Concord, where they were met by more than 300 American patriots and were forced to withdraw. On their march back to Boston, they were continually harried by colonists firing from behind barns, trees, and roadside walls. Deaths totaled 273 British and 95 Americans.

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▪ United States history
      (April 19, 1775), initial skirmishes between British regulars and American provincials, marking the beginning of the American Revolution. Acting on orders from London to suppress the rebellious colonists, General Thomas Gage (Gage, Thomas), recently appointed royal governor of Massachusetts, ordered his troops to seize the colonists' military stores at Concord. En route from Boston, the British force of 700 men was met on Lexington Green by 77 local minutemen and others who had been forewarned of the raid by the colonists' efficient lines of communication, including the ride of Paul Revere (Revere, Paul). It is unclear who fired the first shot. Resistance melted away at Lexington, and the British moved on to Concord. Most of the American military supplies had been hidden or destroyed before the British troops arrived. A British covering party at Concord's North Bridge was finally confronted by 320 to 400 American patriots and forced to withdraw. The march back to Boston was a genuine ordeal for the British, with Americans continually firing on them from behind roadside houses, barns, trees, and stone walls. This experience established guerrilla warfare as the colonists' best defense strategy against the British. Total losses were British 273, American 95. The Battles of Lexington and Concord confirmed the alienation between the majority of colonists and the mother country, and it roused 16,000 New Englanders to join forces and begin the Siege of Boston (Boston, Siege of), resulting in its evacuation by the British the following March.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Lexington — /lek sing teuhn/, n. 1. a town in E Massachusetts, NW of Boston: first battle of American Revolution fought here April 19, 1775. 29,479. 2. a city in N Kentucky. 204,165. 3. a city in central North Carolina. 15,711. * * * City (pop., 2000:… …   Universalium

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