Lascaux Grotto

Cave near Montignac, Fr.

, that contains perhaps the most outstanding known display of prehistoric art. Discovered in 1940, it consists of a main cavern and several steep galleries, all magnificently decorated with engraved, drawn, and painted animals, some of them portrayed in a "twisted perspective." Among the most notable images are four great aurochs bulls, a curious unicorn-type animal that may represent a mythical creature, and a rare narrative composition involving a bird-man figure and a speared bison. About 1,500 bone engravings have also been found at the site, which has been dated to the late Aurignacian period (с 15,000 BC). Because of heavy tourist traffic, the cave was closed to the public in 1963, but a full-scale facsimile, Lascaux II, was opened in 1983. See also rock art.

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French  Grotte de Lascaux 

cave containing one of the most outstanding displays of prehistoric art yet discovered. Located above the Vézère River valley near Montignac, in Dordogne, France, the cave is a short distance upstream from the Eyzies-de-Tayac (Eyzies-de-Tayac caves) series of caves. Lascaux, together with some two dozen other painted caves and 150 prehistoric settlements in the Vézère valley, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1979.

 The cave was discovered by four teenage boys in September 1940 and was first studied by the French archaeologist Henri Breuil (Breuil, Henri). It consists of a main cavern (some 66 feet [20 metres] wide and 16 feet [5 metres] high) and several steep galleries. Each is magnificently decorated with engraved, drawn, and painted figures, in all some 600 painted and drawn animals and symbols and nearly 1,500 engravings. The paintings were done on a light background in various shades of red, black, brown, and yellow. In places, a scaffolding was clearly used to reach high walls and the ceiling. Among the most remarkable pictures are four huge aurochs (some 16 feet [5 metres] long), their horns portrayed in a “twisted perspective”; a curious two-horned animal (misleadingly nicknamed the “unicorn”), perhaps intended as a mythical creature; red deer with fantastic antlers; numerous horses; the heads and necks of several stags (3 feet [almost 1 metre] tall), which appear to be swimming across a river; a series of six felines; two male bison; and a rare narrative composition, at the bottom of a shaft, that has been variously interpreted as a hunting accident or as a shamanistic scene.

      Despite its fame and importance, Lascaux is very poorly dated. Radiocarbon dating (carbon-14 dating) of some charcoal has given a date of 17,000 years ago, and the orthodox view is that the cave is a largely homogeneous collection of images spanning at most a few centuries before and after that date. Other specialists are certain that the cave's art is a highly complex accumulation of artistic episodes spanning a much longer period.

      The cave was in perfect condition when first discovered and was opened to the public in 1948; its floor level was quickly lowered to accommodate a walkway. The ensuing pedestrian traffic (as many as 100,000 annual visitors) and the use of artificial lighting caused the once-vivid colours to fade and brought about the growth of algae, bacteria, and crystals. A huge amount of crucial archaeological information and material was destroyed in the process. Thus, in 1963 the cave was again closed; the growth of crystals was halted, while the growth of algae and bacteria was both halted and reversed. In 2001 microorganisms, mushrooms, and bacteria were again noted in the cave, and daily monitoring of conditions continues. In 1983 a partial replica, Lascaux II, was opened nearby for public viewing.

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Universalium. 2010.

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