Kakinomoto Hitomaro

known as Hitomaro

died 708, Japan

Japanese poet.

He entered the service of the imperial court and later became a provincial official. Japan's first great literary figure, he lived when Japan was moving from a preliterate to a literate, civilized society. His writings, on a wide range of subjects, balance the homely qualities of primitive song with sophisticated interests and literary techniques. All 77 poems accepted as indisputably his, and many others attributed to him, appear in the Man'yoshu, the first and largest of Japan's anthologies of native poetry.

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▪ Japanese poet
also called  Kakinomoto no Hitomaro  
died 708, Japan

      poet venerated by the Japanese since earliest times. He was also Japan's first great literary figure.

      Among his surviving works are poems in the two major Japanese poetic forms of his day—tanka and chōka. Probably he also wrote sedōka (“head-repeated poem,” consisting of two three-line verses of 5, 7, 7 syllables), a relatively minor song form that seems to have been first adapted to literary purposes by Hitomaro and to have barely survived him. All of the poems accepted as indisputably authored by Hitomaro (61 tanka and 16 chōka), as well as a large number of others attributed to him, are to be found in the Man'yōshū (Man'yō-shū) (“Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves”), the first and largest of Japan's anthologies of native poetry. These poems, together with notes by the compilers, are the chief source for information on his life, about which very little is known.

      Hitomaro is believed to have been born and reared near Nara. He entered the service of the court in a minor capacity, serving successively two imperial princes; imperial activities are celebrated in some of his most famous poems. Later he became a provincial official, and he is believed to have died in Iwami province (now Shimane prefecture). He seems to have had at least two wives.

      Standing on the threshold of Japan's emergence from a preliterate to a literate, civilized society, Hitomaro achieved in his poems a splendid balance between the homely qualities of primitive song and the more sophisticated interests and literary techniques of a new age. He inherited the stiff techniques, plain imagery, and restricted range and subject matter—the traditional “word hoard”—of preliterate song. To that inheritance he added new subjects, modes, and concerns, as well as new rhetorical and other structural techniques (some of which may have been adapted from Chinese poetry), along with a new seriousness and importance of treatment and tone. Many of his longer poems are introduced by a kind of solemn “overture,” relating the present with the divine past of the Japanese land and people.

      All of Hitomaro's poems are suffused with a deep personal lyricism and with a broad humanity and sense of identity with others. Outstanding among his works are his poem on the ruined capital at Ōmi; his celebration of Prince Karu's journey to the plains of Aki; two poems each on the death of his first wife and on parting from his second; his lament on the death of Prince Takechi; and his poem composed on finding the body of a man on the island of Samine.

Additional Reading
Ian Hideo Levy, Hitomaro and the Birth of Japanese Lyricism (1984), is an excellent study of Hitomaro's poetry.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Kakinomoto No Hitomaro — par Kikuchi Yōsai …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Kakinomoto no Hitomaro — (柿本 人麻呂; c. 662 710) was a Japanese poet and aristocrat of the late Asuka period. He was the most prominent of the poets included in the Man yōshū , and was particularly represented in volumes 1 and 2 .Works and fameHitomaro was famed for his… …   Wikipedia

  • Kakinomoto no Hitomaro — par Kikuchi Yōsai Kakinomot …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Kakinomoto no Hitomaro — Hitomaro por Kikuchi Yosai Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, del Ogura Hyakunin I …   Wikipedia Español

  • Kakinomoto no Hitomaro — (Hitomaro) (fl. 689–700)    The acknowledged genius of the huge eighth century Japanese poetry anthology called the MAN’YŌSHŪ, the court poet Hitomaro, as he is familiarly known, is widely regarded as master of the verse form called the chōka, or …   Encyclopedia of medieval literature

  • Kakinomoto no Hitomaro — Kakinomoto no Hitomaro,   japanischer Lyriker, * um 660, ✝ um 710. Die Thematik seiner ausdrucksstarken (in der altjapanischen Anthologie »Manyōshū« enthaltenen) Gedichte wird von shintoistisch nationalischen Ideen, Liebe und Naturerleben… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Kakinomoto no Hitomaro — Hitomaru, Gemälde von Kanō Tan’yū, 1648 Kakinomoto no Hitomaro (jap. 柿本 人麻呂/柿本 人麿, gen. Hitomaro; * ca. 660; † ca. 720) war ein japanischer Dichter …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Man'yoshu — Das Man’yōshū (jap. 萬葉集 bzw. 万葉集, dt. Sammlung der zehntausend Blätter) war die erste große japanische Gedichtzusammenstellung. Es handelt sich um eine Sammlung von mehr als 4.500 Gedichten, die unter anderen den Kokashū und den Ruijū Karin… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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