George, Saint

flourished 3rd century
died traditionally Lydda, Palestine; feast day April 23

Early Christian martyr and patron saint of England.

His historical existence is uncertain, but from the 6th century he was the subject of legends as a warrior-saint. He was said to have rescued a Libyan king's daughter from a dragon, which he killed in return for a promise that the king's subjects would be baptized. In art, the young saint often wears knight's armor ornamented with a scarlet cross. He probably became England's patron saint in the 14th century, when Edward III made him patron of the Order of the Garter.

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▪ Christian martyr
flourished 3rd century, ; d. traditionally Lydda, Palestine [now Lod, Israel]; feast day April 23

      early Christian martyr who during the Middle Ages became an ideal of martial valour and selflessness. He is the patron saint of England.

      Nothing of George's life or deeds can be established, but legends about him as a warrior-saint, dating from the 6th century, became popular and increasingly extravagant. Jacob de Voragine's Legenda aurea (1265–66; Golden Legend) repeats the story of his rescuing a Libyan king's daughter from a dragon and then slaying the monster in return for a promise by the king's subjects to be baptized. George's slaying of the dragon may be a Christian version of the legend of Perseus, who was said to have rescued Andromeda from a sea monster near Lydda. It is a theme much represented in art, the saint frequently being depicted as a youth wearing knight's armour with a scarlet cross.

      George was known in England by at least the 8th century. Returning crusaders likely popularized his cult (he was said to have been seen helping the Franks at the Battle of Antioch in 1098), but he was probably not recognized as England's patron saint until after King Edward III (reigned 1327–77) made him the patron of the newly founded Order of the Garter. He was also adopted as protector of several other medieval powers, including Portugal, Genoa, and Venice. With the passing of the chivalric age and finally the Protestant Reformation, the cult of Saint George dwindled. His feast is given a lesser status in the calendar of the Church of England; a holy day of obligation for English Roman Catholics until the late 18th century, it is now an optional memorial for local observance.

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Universalium. 2010.

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