Futabatei Shimei

orig. Hasegawa Tatsunosuke

born April 4, 1864, Edo, Japan
died May 10, 1909, at sea in Bay of Bengal

Japanese novelist and translator.

He is best known for Ukigumo (1887–89; "The Drifting Clouds"), his first novel, and for his translations of stories by Ivan Turgenev. In these he used a style called gembun itchi ("unification of spoken and written language"), one of the first attempts at a modern colloquial idiom. His later works include the novels An Adopted Husband (1906) and Mediocrity (1907). He is credited with bringing modern realism to the Japanese novel.

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▪ Japanese author
pseudonym of  Hasegawa Tatsunosuke  
born April 4, 1864, Edo [now Tokyo], Japan
died May 10, 1909, at sea in Bay of Bengal

      Japanese novelist and translator of Russian literature; his Ukigumo (1887–89; “The Drifting Clouds,” translated, with a study of his life and career, by M. Ryan as Japan's First Modern Novel: Ukigumo of Futabatei Shimei), brought modern realism to the Japanese novel.

      Although Futabatei wrote three novels and translated many stories, he is best known for Ukigumo, his first novel, and for his earliest translations of stories by the Russian writer Ivan Turgenev, Aibiki (“The Rendezvous”) and Meguriai (“Chance Meetings”), both published in 1888. In these works Futabatei used a style called gembun itchi (unification of spoken and written language), one of the first attempts to replace classical Japanese literary language and syntax with the modern colloquial idiom.

      Born to an aristocratic samurai family, Futabatei studied Russian at the Tokyo School of Foreign Languages (1881–86), where he became interested particularly in Ivan Goncharov, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Turgenev, and Vissarion Belinsky. He began his literary career soon after leaving school, with the help of the critic, novelist, and translator Tsubouchi Shōyō. Ukigumo, a story in which an ineffectual idealist loses out in the rude world of rapidly modernizing late 19th-century Japan, and Futabatei's translations of fiction were well received. Futabatei, however, was displeased with his novel and in need of money, so in 1889 he joined the staff of the government gazette Kampō, where he remained until 1897. He did not write another novel for nearly 10 years. From 1898 to 1902 he taught Russian and worked for government agencies, later going to Haerbin and Beijing in China. After returning to Japan in 1903, he resumed translating fiction professionally and in 1904 became the Tokyo correspondent for the Ōsaka Asahi newspaper. Between 1896 and 1909 his output included translations of stories by Turgenev, Nikolay Gogol, Leo Tolstoy, and Maksim Gorky; articles on Esperanto, literary criticism, and social conditions; and two novels, Sono omokage (1906; An Adopted Husband) and Heibon (1907; Mediocrity). In 1908 Futabatei traveled to Russia as a correspondent for the Asahi but fell ill and died en route from Russia to Japan.

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Universalium. 2010.

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