Forcados River

River, southern Nigeria.

A navigable channel of the Niger River, it leaves the main course of the Niger about 20 mi (32 km) downstream from Aboh and flows 123 mi (198 km) westerly to the Bight of Benin. Since с 1900 it has been the chief link for small-ship traffic between the Niger and the Gulf of Guinea.

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      river, a major navigable channel of the Niger Delta, southern Nigeria. It leaves the main course of the Niger River about 20 miles (32 km) downstream from Aboh and flows through zones of freshwater swamps, mangrove swamps, and coastal sand ridges before completing its 123-mile (198-kilometre) westerly course to the Bight of Benin. Since about 1900 it has been the chief link for small ship traffic between the Niger River and the Gulf of Guinea.

      Forcados and Burutu, respectively 15 and 20 miles (24 and 32 km) upstream from the Bight, are ports on the river; but much of the agricultural produce shipped down the Niger and the Forcados is instead exported from Warri, a Delta port connected to the river by the 25-mile- (40-kilometre-) long Warri River. Petroleum deposits were discovered offshore from Burutu in 1964, and crude oil was exported from a loading point at sea after 1965. In 1971 the disused port of Forcados was revived as an oil tanker terminal, connected by pipelines to the oilfields.

      Although the Forcados River is used by considerable commercial traffic, oceangoing vessels have not been able to use its exit to the sea since 1939 because of accumulated silt. Rivercraft and larger vessels now cross to the sea by the Escravos River, an arm of the Niger immediately to the north that was enlarged (1961–64) to accommodate vessels of 22-foot (7-metre) draft.

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Universalium. 2010.

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