Durham, John George Lambton, 1st earl of

born April 12, 1792, London
died July 28, 1840, Cowes, Isle of Wight, Eng.

British colonial administrator in Canada.

He was a member of the British House of Commons (1813–28) and served in the cabinet of Earl Grey (1830–33). In 1838 he was appointed governor-general and lord high commissioner of Canada. He appointed a new executive council to placate the rebellious French Canadians of Lower Canada (later Quebec). Criticized in England for his action, he resigned. He later issued the Durham Report, which advocated the union of Lower Canada and Upper Canada and the expansion of self-government to preserve Canadian loyalty to Britain.

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▪ British statesman
also called  (1828–33) Baron Durham  
born April 12, 1792, London
died July 28, 1840, Cowes, Isle of Wight, Eng.
 British reformist Whig statesman sometimes known as “Radical Jack,” governor-general and lord high commissioner of Canada, and nominal author of the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), which for many years served as a guide to British imperial policy. The “Durham Report” was largely written by his chief secretary in Canada, Charles Buller (1806–48).

      The son of a great landowner in Durham County, Lambton sat in the House of Commons from 1813 to 1828, when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Durham. (He was created an earl in 1833.) By his second marriage he became the son-in-law of Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey (Grey, Charles Grey, 2nd Earl), a leading Whig and future prime minister (1830–32), but his proposals for wide extension of the franchise and other radical measures were distasteful to Grey and other orthodox Whigs.

      In 1830 Durham entered Grey's Cabinet as lord privy seal, and with Lord John Russell (afterward 1st Earl Russell and twice prime minister) and two others, he drafted the first parliamentary Reform Bill (1831; not enacted). After the passage of the third Reform Bill the following year, Durham was sent on diplomatic missions to Russia, Prussia, and Austria and then resigned as lord privy seal (1833). From July 1835 to June 1837 he was ambassador to Russia.

      Appointed governor-general and lord high commissioner of Canada, Durham arrived at Quebec in May 1838 in the aftermath of political rebellion. Faced with French-Canadian hostility, virtual anarchy in Lower Canada (the modern province of Quebec), and possible expansion of the United States into Canada, he was given almost dictatorial powers.

      Durham organized a new and more conciliatory executive council, and on June 28, 1838, the day of Queen Victoria's coronation, he proclaimed an amnesty for all French-Canadian rebels except for 24 of their leaders. For his moderation he was reviled in England. The prime minister, Lord Melbourne, disavowed Durham's actions, whereupon the governor-general resigned and issued a self-justifying proclamation.

      After returning to England, Durham submitted his memorable report to the colonial office on Jan. 31, 1839. He advocated the union of Lower Canada with Upper Canada (present-day Ontario), with a large measure of self-government in order to preserve Canadian loyalty to Great Britain and thereby to forestall the annexation of Canada by the United States. Accepting the theory of imperial government put forth by Buller and Edward Gibbon Wakefield, Durham prescribed “responsible government,” a Cabinet of colonists whose recommendations on internal affairs were to be executed by the governor-general. Foreign policy and international trade were to continue to be regulated from London. He also strongly recommended that the French-Canadians be harassed into abandoning their language and become completely assimilated to the Anglo-Canadians. The union of the two Canadas (by proclamation in 1841) was intended in part to perpetuate the minority status of the French.

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Universalium. 2010.

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