Clarendon, Constitutions of

(1164) Sixteen articles issued by King Henry II defining church-state relations in England.

Designed to restrict ecclesiastical privileges and curb the power of the church courts, the constitutions provoked the famous quarrel between Henry and St. Thomas Becket. Among their controversial measures were the provisions that all revenues from vacant sees and monasteries reverted to the king, who had discretion in filling the vacant offices, and that clerics charged with serious crimes were to be tried in secular courts. Becket's martyrdom in 1170 forced Henry to moderate his attack on the clergy, but he did not repudiate the constitutions.

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▪ English history
      16 articles issued in January 1164 by King Henry II defining church–state relations in England. Designed to restrict ecclesiastical privileges and curb the power of the church courts, the constitutions provoked the famous quarrel between Henry and his archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket.

      During the chaotic reign of Henry's predecessor, Stephen (1135–54), the ecclesiastical courts, bolstered by the growth of canon law, had usurped many secular judicial prerogatives. The constitutions purported to restore the customs of the realm observed in the reign of Henry I (1100–35), but their strict statement exceeded all precedent. By their provisions, the king's consent was required for clerics to leave the realm or for judicial appeals to be made to Rome. The church was restricted in its powers of excommunication and interdiction and forbidden to act against laymen on secret information. The king was given the revenues from all vacant sees and monasteries and allowed discretion in the filling of vacancies. Cases of advowson (church patronage), church debt, and land held in lay fee were reserved to secular courts.

      Church courts were given effective control over church property, but in cases where tenure was disputed between a layman and an ecclesiastic, a secular jury had jurisdiction. The most controversial provision (clause 3) exposed priests charged with serious felony to secular punishment. Though ecclesiastical courts were notoriously lenient to “criminous clerks,” it was this provision that provoked the greatest protest from Becket.

      When the King presented the constitutions at Clarendon in January, the bishops, led by Becket, reluctantly promised to observe them. Within a year, however, he repudiated his oath and was forced into six years of exile by Henry. Becket's martyrdom in 1170 forced Henry to moderate his attack on the clergy, but he did not specifically repudiate a single clause of the constitutions. By the 13th century, “criminous clerks” were tried in secular courts for their second offense. First offenders enjoyed “benefit of clergy.”

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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