Avignon papacy

Roman Catholic papacy during the period 1309–77, when the popes resided at Avignon, France.

Elected pope through the machinations of Philip IV of France, Clement V moved the papal capital to Avignon four years later primarily for political reasons. All seven popes of this period were French, as were most of the cardinals, which aroused English and German animosity. During the Avignon papacy the cardinals began to play a stronger role in church government, church and clergy were reformed, missionary efforts were expanded, and popes tried to settle royal rivalries and establish peace. The heavy French influence damaged the prestige of the papacy, however, and in 1377 Gregory XI returned to Rome. The cardinals elected a new pope who took the Avignon seat, becoming the first of a line of antipopes and beginning the Western Schism.

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 Roman Catholic papacy during the period 1309–77, when the popes took up residence at Avignon instead of at Rome, primarily because of the current political conditions.

      Distressed by factionalism in Rome and pressed to come to France by Philip IV, Pope Clement V moved the papal capital to Avignon, which at that time belonged to vassals of the pope. In 1348 it became direct papal property. Although the Avignon papacy was overwhelmingly French in complexion (all seven of the popes during the period were French, as were 111 of the 134 cardinals created), it was not so responsive to French pressure as contemporaries assumed or as later critics insisted. During this time the Sacred College of Cardinals began to gain a stronger role in the government of the church; a vast reorganization and centralization of administrative offices and other agencies was effected; reform measures for the clergy were initiated; expanded missionary enterprises, which reached as far as China, were stimulated; university education was promoted; and numerous attempts were made by the popes to settle royal rivalries and to establish peace. Nevertheless, the antagonism, especially within England and Germany, to the residency at Avignon damaged the prestige of the papacy.

      After Gregory XI reestablished the papal capital in Rome, cardinals of the Sacred College selected a second pope, who assumed the vacant Avignon seat. This marked the onset of the Great Schism (Western Schism). A succession of such “antipopes” were selected, and the Great Schism was not healed until 1417. The increased power and ambitions of the cardinals led, no doubt, to the Great Schism and to the subsequent emergence of conciliarism, a theory that a general council of the church has greater authority than the pope and may, if necessary, depose him.

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Universalium. 2010.

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