Young's modulus

a coefficient of elasticity of a substance, expressing the ratio between a stress that acts to change the length of a body and the fractional change in length caused by this force.
[1860-65; named after Thomas YOUNG, who derived it]

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      numerical constant, named for the 18th-century English physician and physicist Thomas Young (Young, Thomas), that describes the elastic (elasticity) properties of a solid undergoing tension or compression in only one direction, as in the case of a metal rod that after being stretched or compressed lengthwise returns to its original length. Young's modulus is a measure of the ability of a material to withstand changes in length when under lengthwise tension or compression. Sometimes referred to as the modulus of elasticity, Young's modulus is equal to the longitudinal stress divided by the strain. Stress and strain may be described as follows in the case of a metal bar under tension.

 If a metal bar of cross-sectional area A is pulled by a force F at each end, the bar stretches from its original length L0 to a new length Ln. (Simultaneously the cross section decreases.) The stress is the quotient of the tensile force divided by the cross-sectional area, or F/A. The strain or relative deformation is the change in length, LnL0, divided by the original length, or (LnL0)/L0. (Strain is dimensionless.) Thus Young's modulus may be expressed mathematically as

      Young's modulus = stress/strain = (FL0)/A(LnL0).

      This is a specific form of Hooke's law of elasticity. The units of Young's modulus in the English system are pounds per square inch (psi), and in the metric system newtons per square metre (N/m2). The value of Young's modulus for aluminum is about 1.0 × 107 psi, or 7.0 × 1010 N/m2. The value for steel is about three times greater, which means that it takes three times as much force to stretch a steel bar the same amount as a similarly shaped aluminum bar.

      Young's modulus is meaningful only in the range in which the stress is proportional to the strain, and the material returns to its original dimensions when the external force is removed. As stresses increase, Young's modulus may no longer remain constant but decrease, or the material may either flow, undergoing permanent deformation, or finally break.

      When a metal bar under tension is elongated, its width is slightly diminished. This lateral shrinkage constitutes a transverse strain that is equal to the change in the width divided by the original width. The ratio of the transverse strain to the longitudinal strain is called Poisson's ratio. The average value of Poisson's ratio for steels is 0.28, and for aluminum alloys, 0.33. The volume of materials that have Poisson's ratios less than 0.50 increase under longitudinal tension and decrease under longitudinal compression.

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Universalium. 2010.

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