wrist

/rist/, n.
1. the carpus or lower part of the forearm where it joins the hand.
2. the joint or articulation between the forearm and the hand.
3. the part of an article of clothing that fits around the wrist.
4. Mach. See wrist pin.
[bef. 950; ME, OE; c. G Rist back of hand, ON rist instep; akin to WRITHE]

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also called  carpus 
 complex joint between the five metacarpal bones of the hand and the radius and ulna bones of the forearm. The wrist is composed of eight or nine small, short bones (carpal bones (carpal bone)) roughly arranged in two rows. The wrist is also made up of several component joints: the distal radioulnar joint, which acts as a pivot for the forearm bones; the radiocarpal joint, between the radius and the first row of carpal bones, involved in wrist flexion and extension; the midcarpal joint, between two of the rows of carpal bones; and various intercarpal joints, between adjacent carpal bones within the rows. The numerous bones and their complex articulations give the wrist its flexibility and wide range of motion.

      A disk of fibrous cartilage between the radius and the ulna separates the radioulnar joint from the rest of the wrist, which is contained within a capsule of cartilage, synovial membrane, and ligaments. Radiocarpal ligaments carry the hand along with the forearm in rotational movements, and intercarpal ligaments strengthen the small wristbones.

      The large number of bones in the wrist force blood vessels and nerves in the area to pass through a narrow opening, the carpal tunnel. In carpal tunnel syndrome, a narrowing of this opening painfully compresses the nerves during wrist flexion. Other common wrist problems include bone fractures, dislocations of the various component joints, and inflamed tendons and ligaments from overuse.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wrist — Wrist, n. [OE. wriste, wrist, AS. wrist; akin to OFries. wriust, LG. wrist, G. rist wrist, instep, Icel. rist instep, Dan. & Sw. vrist, and perhaps to E. writhe.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Anat.) The joint, or the region of the joint, between the hand… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wrist — wrist; wrist·band; wrist·bone; wrist·drop; wrist·er; wrist·let; wrist·lock; wrist·watch; wrist·work; …   English syllables

  • wrist — [rist] n. [ME < OE < base of wræstan, to twist, WREST] 1. the joint or part of the arm between the hand and the forearm; carpus 2. the corresponding part in an animal 3. the part of a sleeve, glove, etc. that covers the wrist 4. WRIST PIN ☆ …   English World dictionary

  • wrist — (n.) O.E. wrist, from P.Gmc. *wristiz (Cf. O.N. rist instep, O.Fris. wrist, M.Du. wrist, Ger. Rist back of the hand, instep ), from P.Gmc. *wrig , *wreik to turn (see WRY (Cf. wry)). The notion is the turning joint …   Etymology dictionary

  • wrist — S3 [rıst] n [: Old English;] the part of your body where your hand joins your arm on/around your wrist ▪ She had a gold watch on her wrist …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • wrist — [ rıst ] noun count ** the part of your body between your hand and your arm: He looked at the gold watch on his wrist. a. slash your wrists to cut your wrists, especially in order to hurt or kill yourself …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • wrist|y — «RIHS tee», adjective. performed by flexure of the wrist; marked by or skilled in wristwork: »wristy shots or strokes, a wristy play …   Useful english dictionary

  • wrist — ► NOUN ▪ the joint connecting the hand with the forearm. ORIGIN Old English, probably related to WRITHE(Cf. ↑writhe) …   English terms dictionary

  • wrist|er — «RIHS tuhr», noun. U.S. Dialect. a wristlet …   Useful english dictionary

  • Wrist — Wappen Deutschlandkarte …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • wrist — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ bony, slender, small, thin, tiny ▪ limp, weak ▪ broken, fractured …   Collocations dictionary

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