Wick

/wik/, n.
a town in the Highland region, in N Scotland: herring fisheries. 7613.

* * *

      royal burgh (town) and fishing port, Highland council area, historic county of Caithness, Scotland. An ancient Norse settlement on the North Sea, situated about 14 miles (23 km) south of John o'Groats, Wick developed as a fishing port and centre and was designated a royal burgh in 1589. It expanded rapidly during the herring boom of the 19th century. Since then herring fishing has declined and been replaced by the smaller whitefish industry. Several light manufacturing industries have been established, including the Caithness glass-blowing factory, which attracts thousands of visitors each year. Wick Airport provides important links to cities to the south. Pop. (2001) 7,333.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wick — heißen folgende Orte: Wick (Schottland) Wick (South Gloucestershire) Wick (Iowa) Wick ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Armin Wick (1914–2008), deutscher Schauspieler und Regisseur Douglas Wick (* 1954), US amerikanischer Filmproduzent… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Wick —    WICK, a royal burgh, the county town, and a parish, in the county of Caithness; containing, with Pulteney Town adjoining and the villages of Sarclet, Staxigoe, Reiss, and Ackergill, 10,393 inhabitants, of whom 1333 are in the town, 16 miles (S …   A Topographical dictionary of Scotland

  • Wick — may refer to: * Helmut Wick, World War II fighter Ace * Candle wick, the cord used in a candle or oil lamp * Denis Wick, trombonist and brass instrument teacher * Wick Airport, Scotland * Gian Carlo Wick, theoretical physicist * WICK, the call… …   Wikipedia

  • Wick — Vista del Río Wick …   Wikipedia Español

  • wick — wik n a strip of material (as gauze) placed in a wound to serve as a drain wick vt to absorb or drain (as fluid or moisture) like a wick often used with away{{}}<a dry gauze dressing was used to wick exudate away from the wound> …   Medical dictionary

  • wick — (w[i^]k), n. [OE. wicke, weyke, weke, AS. weoca or wecca; cf. D. wiek a roll of lint, Prov. G. wicke, and wieche, OHG. wiohha, Sw. veke, Dan. v[ae]ge; of uncertain origin.] A bundle of fibers, or a loosely twisted or braided cord, tape, or tube,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wick — [wık] n ↑flame, ↑wax, ↑wick [: Old English; Origin: weoce] 1.) the piece of thread in a ↑candle, that burns when you light it 2.) a long piece of material in an oil lamp, that sucks up oil so that the lamp can burn 3.) get on sb s wick …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • wick — ► NOUN 1) a strip of porous material up which liquid fuel is drawn by capillary action to the flame in a candle, lamp, or lighter. 2) Medicine a gauze strip inserted in a wound to drain it. ► VERB ▪ absorb or draw off (liquid) by capillary action …   English terms dictionary

  • wick — wick, v. i. (Curling) To strike a stone in an oblique direction. Jamieson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wick — (w[i^]k), or Wich Wich (w[i^]ch), n. [AS. w[=i]c village, fr. L. vicus. In some names of places, perhaps fr. Icel. v[=i]k an inlet, creek, bay. See {Vicinity}, and cf. {Villa}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A street; a village; a castle; a dwelling; a place …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wick — wick1 [wik] n. [ME wicke < OE weoca, akin to Ger wieche, wick yarn < IE base * weg , to weave: see VEIL] a piece of cord or tape, or a thin bundle of threads, in a candle, oil lamp, cigarette lighter, etc., designed to absorb fuel by… …   English World dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.