Whiskey Rebellion

U.S. Hist.
a revolt of settlers in western Pennsylvania in 1794 against a federal excise tax on whiskey: suppressed by militia called out by President George Washington to establish the authority of the federal government.

* * *

(1794) American uprising to protest a federal liquor tax.

Farmers in western Pennsylvania rebelled against paying a tax on their locally distilled whiskey and attacked federal revenue collectors. After 500 armed men burned the home of the regional tax inspector, Pres. George Washington ordered 13,000 federal troops to the area. The rebellion quickly dissolved without further violence. The event established the authority of federal law within the states and strengthened support for the Federalists' advocacy of a strong central government.

* * *

▪ United States history
      (1794), in American history, uprising that afforded the new U.S. government its first opportunity to establish federal authority by military means within state boundaries, as officials moved into western Pennsylvania to quell an uprising of settlers rebelling against the liquor tax. Alexander Hamilton, secretary of the Treasury, had proposed the excise (enacted by Congress in 1791) to raise money for the national debt and to assert the power of the national government. Small farmers of the back country distilled (and consumed) whiskey, which was easier to transport and sell than the grain that was its source. It was an informal currency, a means of livelihood, and an enlivener of a harsh existence. The distillers resisted the tax by attacking federal revenue officers who attempted to collect it.

      Enforcement legislation touched off what appeared to be an organized rebellion, and in July of 1794 about 500 armed men attacked and burned the home of the regional tax inspector. The following month President George Washington (Washington, George) issued a congressionally authorized proclamation ordering the rebels to return home and calling for militia from four neighbouring states. After fruitless negotiations, Washington ordered some 13,000 troops into the area, but opposition melted away and no battle ensued. Troops occupied the region and some of the rebels were tried, but the two convicted of treason were later pardoned by the president.

      Many Americans, particularly members of the opposition Jeffersonian Republican Party (Democratic-Republican Party), were appalled by the overwhelming use of governmental force, which they feared might be a first step to absolute power. To Federalists, however, the most important result was that the national authority had triumphed over its first rebellious adversary and had won the support of the state governments in enforcing federal law within the states.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Whiskey Rebellion — The Whiskey Rebellion, less commonly known as the Whiskey Insurrection, was a popular uprising that had its beginnings in 1791 and culminated in an insurrection in 1794 in the locality of Washington, Pennsylvania, in the Monongahela Valley. The… …   Wikipedia

  • Whiskey-Rebellion — Washington führt seine Truppen nach Pennsylvania (ca. 1795) Als Whiskey Rebellion bezeichnet man den Aufstand der Siedler im Tal des Monongahela River im Westen Pennsylvanias von 1794, die gegen eine Steuer auf Alkohol und alkoholische Getränke… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Whiskey Rebellion — Révolte du Whisky Washington mène ses troupes dans l ouest de la Pennsylvanie (Metropolitan Museum of Art) La Révolte du whisky (en anglais Whiskey Rebellion) est un soulèvement populaire qui débuta en 1791 et connut son apogée en 1794 dans la… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Whiskey Rebellion — U.S. Hist. a revolt of settlers in western Pennsylvania in 1794 against a federal excise tax on whiskey: suppressed by militia called out by President George Washington to establish the authority of the federal government …   Useful english dictionary

  • Whiskey Rebellion — uprising in 1794 by farmers in western Pennsylvania to protest the federal excise tax on liquor that was established in 1791 (U.S. History) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Whiskey — Single Malt Whisky mit Nosing Glas Blended Scotch Whisky mit Tumbler Whisky ( …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Whiskey Act — The Whiskey Act was a U.S. federal law passed by the 1st Congress on March 3, 1791, upon the recommendations of Alexander Hamilton, then treasury secretary. It was enacted in accordance with the four economic initiatives embarked by Hamilton at… …   Wikipedia

  • rebellion — /ri bel yeuhn/, n. 1. open, organized, and armed resistance to one s government or ruler. 2. resistance to or defiance of any authority, control, or tradition. 3. the act of rebelling. [1300 50; ME rebellioun < OF < L rebellion (s. of rebellio),… …   Universalium

  • Fries's Rebellion — John Fries s Rebellion, also called the House Tax Rebellion and the Home Tax Rebellion, was an armed tax revolt among Pennsylvania Dutch farmers between 1799 and 1800. Fries s Rebellion was the third of three tax related rebellions in the 18th… …   Wikipedia

  • Bourbon Whiskey — Single Malt Whisky mit Nosing Glas Blended Scotch Whisky mit Tumbler Whisky (in …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.