vaulting

vaulting1
/vawl"ting/, n.
1. the act or process of constructing vaults.
2. the structure forming a vault.
3. a vault, vaulted ceiling, etc., or such structures collectively.
[1505-15; VAULT1 + -ING1]
vaulting2
/vawl"ting/, adj.
1. leaping up or over.
2. used in vaulting: a vaulting pole.
3. excessive in ambition or presumption; overweening; high-flown: vaulting ambition; vaulting pride.
[1525-35; VAULT2 + -ING2]

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Gymnastics exercise in which the athlete leaps over a form that was originally intended to mimic a horse.

At one time, the pommel horse was used in the vaulting exercise, with the pommels (handles) removed. The sanctioning body for gymnastic sport, the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG), decreed in 2001 that a vaulting table would be introduced to replace the horse. In men's vaulting the height of the table is 1.35 m (4.43 ft) from the floor; for women, the height is 1.20 m (3.94 ft). A Reuther board, a type of springboard, is placed in front of the near end of the apparatus. The gymnast runs, gathers momentum while nearing the apparatus, rebounds off the springboard, and, supporting the hands on the apparatus, vaults over it and performs an acrobatic maneuver.

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  gymnastics exercise in which the athlete leaps over a form that was originally intended to mimic a horse. At one time the pommel horse (side horse) was used in the vaulting exercise, with the pommels (handles) removed. Later a cylindrical form made especially for vaulting was used. The sanctioning body for gymnastic sport, the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG), decreed in 2001 that a vaulting table would replace the horse. With its curved front, the vaulting table was designed for the greater safety of the gymnast.

      In men's vaulting the horse was placed lengthwise, and the vaulting table is placed in that same position whether for men or for women. For men the height of the apparatus is 1.35 metres (4.43 feet) measured from the floor. A Reuther board (also called a beatboard), a special type of springboard developed in Germany, is placed in front of the near end of the apparatus. The gymnast takes a run, gathers momentum as he or she nears the apparatus, rebounds off the springboard, and, with hands on the apparatus, vaults over it. A variety of tricks may be performed, such as vaulting over with straddled legs, with legs together and bent into a squatting position, or with legs straight and the hips bent, as well as handsprings, cartwheels, and other more difficult movements. Each vault is evaluated according to a table of standards of difficulty.

      The women's vaulting horse was the same as the men's except that it was lower and was placed sideways instead of lengthwise. Women also used the springboard and performed vaults similar to those done by men, except that the vault was much shorter, since it was performed over the width of the horse rather than its length. For women the vaulting table is 1.25 metres (4.10 feet) high.

      Vaulting has been an Olympic (Olympic Games) event for men since the modern Games began in 1896. Women have competed individually in the event since 1952.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • vaulting — vaulting1 [vôl′tiŋ] n. 1. the building of a vault or vaults 2. the arched work forming a vault 3. a vault or vaults vaulting2 [vôl′tiŋ] adj. 1. leaping or leaping over 2. overreaching; unduly confident …   English World dictionary

  • Vaulting — Vault ing, n. 1. The act of constructing vaults; a vaulted construction. [1913 Webster] 2. Act of one who vaults or leaps. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • vaulting — ► NOUN ▪ ornamental work in a vaulted roof or ceiling …   English terms dictionary

  • vaulting — I. noun Date: 1512 vaulted construction II. adjective Date: 1593 1. reaching or stretching for the heights < vaulting ambition > < a vaulting imagination > 2. designed for use in vaulting or in gymnastic exercises < a …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • vaulting — vault|ing1 [ˈvo:ltıŋ US ˈvo:l ] n [U] ↑arches in a roof or ceiling ▪ Gothic vaulting vaulting 2 vaulting2 adj vaulting ambition literary the desire to achieve as much as possible ▪ a man of vaulting ambition with the talents to match …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • vaulting — 1. noun a) The practice of constructing vaults, or a particular method of such construction. b) A vaulted structure; such structures treated as a group. 2. adjective a) Leaning upward or ov …   Wiktionary

  • vaulting — I. /ˈvɔltɪŋ/ (say vawlting) noun 1. the act or process of constructing vaults. 2. the structure forming a vault or vaults. 3. a vault, vaulted ceiling, or the like, or such structures collectively. {vault1 + ing1} II. /ˈvɔltɪŋ/ (say vawlting)… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Vaulting —    The Senne River had long been subject to torrential flooding, notably in August 1850, and had also become increasingly polluted. Following a cholera epidemic that killed an estimated 3,467 residents in May 1866, the authorities, led by… …   Historical Dictionary of Brussels

  • vaulting — vault|ing1 [ vɔltıŋ ] noun uncount the curved structures in a vaulted ceiling vaulting vault|ing 2 [ vɔltıŋ ] adjective MAINLY LITERARY very determined: a vaulting ambition …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • vaulting — vault·ing || vɔːltɪŋ n. leaping motion; arched structure vɔːlt n. arch, dome; room with an arch or a dome; secure room for storing money or valuables; underground burial chamber; pole vaulting v. leap up or over (especially with the help… …   English contemporary dictionary

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