universalism

/yooh'neuh verr"seuh liz'euhm/, n.
1. universal character; universality.
2. a universal range of knowledge, interests, or activities.
3. (cap.) the doctrine that emphasizes the universal fatherhood of God and the final salvation of all souls. Cf. apocatastasis (def. 2).
[1795-1805; UNIVERSAL + -ISM]

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Belief in the salvation of all souls.

Arising as early as the time of Origen and at various points in Christian history, the concept became an organized movement in North America in the mid-18th century. It maintains the impossibility that a loving God would bestow salvation on only a portion of humankind while dooming the rest to eternal punishment. It stresses the use of reason in religion and the modification of belief in light of the discoveries of science. Thus, the miraculous elements of traditional Christianity are rejected, and Jesus, while a worthy teacher and model, is not held to be divine. Universalist and Unitarian churches in the U.S. merged in 1961 (see Unitarianism).

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      belief in the salvation of all souls. Although Universalism has appeared at various times in Christian history, most notably in the works of Origen of Alexandria in the 3rd century, as an organized movement it had its beginnings in the United States in the middle of the 18th century. The Enlightenment was responsible for mitigating the sterner aspects of Calvinistic theology and preparing the way for the reemergence of the doctrine of universal salvation. The Universalists believed it impossible that a loving God would elect only a portion of mankind to salvation and doom the rest to eternal punishment. They insisted that punishment in the afterlife was for a limited period during which the soul was purified and prepared for eternity in the presence of God.

      The forerunner of Universalism in the United States was George De Benneville (1703–93), who in 1741 migrated from Europe to Pennsylvania, where he preached and practiced medicine. The early Universalist movement was given its greatest impetus by the preaching of John Murray (1741–1815), who moved from England to colonial America in 1770. He propagated the doctrine throughout most of the colonies, often against much opposition from orthodox Christians who believed that Universalism would lead to immorality.

      The Universalism of Murray was a modified Calvinism. Near the close of the 18th century Universalists were to follow Hosea Ballou (Ballou, Hosea) in rejecting Calvinistic tenets. Ballou introduced a Unitarian conception of God and reinterpreted the atonement: the death of Jesus was not a vicarious atonement for the sins of mankind but rather a demonstration of God's infinite and unchangeable love for his children. Ballou also put great stress on the use of reason in religion.

      From the 19th century, Universalists felt a close kinship with Unitarians, since the two groups shared many views and practices. Various attempts to unite the national bodies of the two denominations, the Universalist Church of America and the American Unitarian Association, culminated in the formation of the Unitarian Universalist Association in 1960 and formal merger in 1961.

      Universalist churches are congregational in polity. Each church manages its own affairs but joins with other churches in district or regional groupings. The Unitarian Universalist Association consists of representatives of the local churches and the districts and seeks to give a continental voice to the movement. Each Universalist church is free to choose its own form of worship. Simple, nonliturgical services are most common, with great emphasis put on the sermon.

      From the beginning, Universalists have differed widely in matters of belief. Attempts to write statements of faith, one as late as 1935, met with only partial success. Liberalism, freedom of individual interpretation, tolerance of diversity, agreement on methods of approaching theological and church issues, and belief in the inherent dignity of man have been the strongest elements keeping the movement together. Universalists generally stress the use of reason in religion and modification of belief in the light of the discoveries of science. Thus, the miraculous elements of traditional Christianity are rejected as incompatible with modern knowledge. Jesus is considered a great teacher and an example worthy of imitation, but he is not held to be divine. A broader conception of Universalism began to emerge in the 20th century. Although stressing their ties to the Christian tradition, Universalists were exploring the universal elements of religion and seeking closer relationships with non-Christian religions. See also Unitarianism (Unitarianism and Universalism).

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Universalium. 2010.

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