Sranan

/srah"neuhn/, n.
an English-based creole widely spoken in Suriname. Also called Sranan Tongo, Taki-Taki.
[1950-55; < Sranan: lit., Suriname (tongue)]

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also called  Sranantongo (literally, “Suriname tongue”),  Taki-taki (“talk-talk” or “say-say”),  or  Ningre-tongo (“blacks' tongue”) 

      creole (creole languages) language spoken in Suriname (formerly Dutch Guiana) in northeastern South America. Sranan is spoken by almost the entire population of Suriname as either a first or a second language, as well as by a large emigrant population in The Netherlands. It functions as a lingua franca and as a national language of Suriname, although it has less prestige than Dutch, the country's official language.

      Like Saramaccan, a creole that developed in the region's interior, the ultimate origins of Sranan lie in the nonstandard varieties of English spoken by colonists during the period of English control (1651–67). However, Sranan evolved on the coast. There, near the capital city of Paramaribo, resided a much higher concentration of Dutch colonists than in the interior. Also in contrast to the interior, the coastal region had a dearth of Portuguese speakers.

      When the Dutch took over Suriname in 1667, they decided to keep the local colonial English vernacular, rather than their own national language, as the lingua franca for communication with the slaves. Sranan evolved gradually and increasingly diverged from English during the 18th century, although at all times under heavy Dutch influence. Because some Dutch language structures are similar to English, Sranan is less divergent from English than Saramaccan, although both were equally influenced by the African languages spoken by slaves. The question of the specific contributions of Dutch, and of various African languages, to the structures of Sranan has hardly been investigated, unlike those of Portuguese to Saramaccan.

      Examples of typical sentences in Sranan are Mek konu gi-em moni en bai sani, dan eng sa go kir eng ‘Let the king give him money to buy things, then he will go (and) kill it'; Mi sa gi(bi) yu tin sensi ‘I'll give you ten cents'; and Mi doifi frei gowe, ma mi xoluk, dati tan ‘My dove flew away, but my luck, that stays.'

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sranan — Parlée au Suriname, Guyane française Nombre de locuteurs 300 000 au Suriname, dont 120 000 comme première langue, quelques dizaines de milliers en Guyane française Classification par famille …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Sranan — noun Etymology: Sranan, short for Sranan Tongo, literally, Suriname tongue Date: 1953 an English based creole widely spoken in Suriname called also Sranan Tongo …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Sranan — /srah neuhn/, n. an English based creole widely spoken in Suriname. Also called Sranan Tongo, Taki Taki. [1950 55; < Sranan: lit., Suriname (tongue)] …   Useful english dictionary

  • Sranan — [ srα:nən] noun another term for Taki Taki. Origin from Taki Taki Sranan tongo, lit. Suriname tongue …   English new terms dictionary

  • Sranan — noun The Sranantongo English based creole of Suriname …   Wiktionary

  • sranan — sra·nan …   English syllables

  • Sranan — Sra•nan [[t]ˈsrɑ nən[/t]] n. peo an English based creole widely spoken in Suriname. Also called Sra′nan Ton′go [[t]ˈtɒŋ goʊ[/t]] Taki Taki …   From formal English to slang

  • Sranan-Tongo — Gesprochen in Suriname Sprecher 300.000 Linguistische Klassifikation Kreolsprachen Englischbasiert Sranan Tongo Sprachcodes …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sranan Tongo — Gesprochen in Suriname Sprecher 300.000 Linguistische Klassifikation Kreolsprachen Englischbasiert Sranan Tongo Sprachcodes …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sranan tongo — Sranan Sranan Parlée au Suriname, Guyane française Nombre de locuteurs 300 000 au Suriname, dont 120 000 comme première langue, quelques dizaines de milliers en Guyane française Classification par famille     Pidgins et… …   Wikipédia en Français

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