space law

the projected law that would govern the use of outer space by various nations based on certain treaties.
[1950-55]

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      the body of regulations in international law that governs conduct in and related to areas of space above Earth's lower atmosphere.

      The evolution of space law began with U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower's introduction of the concept into the United Nations in 1957, in connection with disarmament negotiations. Following the successful launchings of the Soviet satellite Sputnik 1 in 1957 and the U.S. satellite Explorer 1 in 1958, both the United States and the U.S.S.R. took an active interest in the development of international space policy. It was established that traditional laws of sovereignty that allow any nation to claim for itself uninhabited and uncivilized lands are not viable in space territories and that countries cannot extend the boundaries of their dominion indefinitely into the space regions above them. In 1959 a permanent Outer Space Committee was formed for the purpose of maintaining the United Nations Charter and other international law in space, which opened the way for peaceful exploration. In 1963 the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty) was signed, followed by an Outer Space Committee resolution to prohibit nuclear weapons testing in space. Later that same year a UN General Assembly declaration acknowledged a free international interest in space development and outlined rules assigning each nation individual responsibility for dealing with transgressions of international law and for any resulting destruction. International cooperation was recommended for the safeguarding of all astronauts in crisis situations.

      In 1967 an Outer Space Treaty was ratified by 63 participants in the United Nations. This agreement reasserted all earlier guidelines for international space conduct. In addition, it banned certain military activities, such as the deployment of weapons of mass destruction in space and on celestial bodies; established each state's ownership of and responsibility for its space projectiles and components; urged common participation in the protection of space and terrestrial environments; and provided for the open observation and inspection of each state's activities and installations by others. This document has been noted as a landmark in the development of international space law; like most subsequent space-law agreements generated by the United Nations, it remains in effect today among participating countries. This treaty was followed in 1968 by an Agreement on the Rescue and Return of Astronauts and the Return of Objects Launched into Space, which reinforced international commitment to the safety of humans in space, assigned economic responsibility to each country for the recovery of its equipment, and confirmed the control of each space power over the vehicles that it launches. Another important treaty, the 1972 Convention on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects, set out detailed rules regarding the recovery of damages for losses caused by space objects.

      Although international diplomacy continues to play an active role in the codification of acceptable space conduct, several issues remain the subjects of debate. Because nations are prohibited from laying claim to space territories, for instance, there is a need to establish regulations governing the apportionment of usable resources that space may eventually provide. A method for determining the extent of each country's control over the air above remains to be agreed upon.

      The development of space for a growing array of government and private activities also poses significant challenges for space law. The agreements on which space law is based were formulated at a time when governments dominated space activities and commercial space ventures were just beginning. Whether these agreements remain adequate and appropriate for the 21st century requires review.

      Various provisions of current space law limit military activities in space, but there is still no overall framework regulating the military uses of space. The wisdom of developing space weapons or, alternatively, of keeping space a weapons-free environment constitutes yet another issue for discussion.

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Universalium. 2010.

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