soup

soupless, adj.souplike, adj.
/soohp/, n.
1. a liquid food made by boiling or simmering meat, fish, or vegetables with various added ingredients.
2. Slang. a thick fog.
3. Slang. added power, esp. horsepower.
4. Slang. nitroglycerine.
5. Photog. Slang. developing solution.
6. from soup to nuts,
a. from the first through the last course of a meal.
b. from beginning to end; to a complete, encompassing degree; leaving nothing out.
7. in the soup, Informal. in trouble: He'll be in the soup when the truth comes out.
v.t.
8. soup up, Slang.
a. to improve the capacity for speed or increase the efficiency of (a motor or engine) by increasing the richness of the fuel mixture or the efficiency of the fuel, or by adjusting the engine.
b. to give spirit or vivacity to; enliven: a political rally souped up by the appearance of the candidates.
[1645-55; 1940-45 for def. 8; < F soupe, OF souppe, sope < Gmc; cf. D sopen to dunk. See SOP]
Syn. 1. broth, stock, potage.

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food
 liquid food prepared by cooking meat, poultry, fish, legumes, or vegetables with seasonings in water, stock, milk, or some other liquid medium. The cooking of soup is as ancient as the devising of vessels to hold liquid; before the development of pots that could withstand the direct heat of a fire, soups were cooked by dropping hot stones into the liquid. The long cooking of soup enabled nourishment to be drawn from meagre quantities of fish and meat too bony or tough to be otherwise utilized.

      In the West lighter soups are usually served as a first course, while thicker, heartier soups constitute the entrée for informal meals. A notable exception are the fruit soups favoured in northern and eastern Europe, which are often served for dessert. In China a thin soup is consumed throughout the meal as a beverage, and elaborate soups such as the celebrated bird's nest and shark's fin may be interspersed with other courses or served near the end of the meal.

      Many soups are eaten cold. French vichyssoise (potatoes and leeks), Spanish gazpacho (tomatoes and other vegetables), Polish chlodnik (beets, sour cream, pickles, and shellfish), Jewish schav (sorrel), and Danish kaernemaelkskoldskaal (buttermilk) are classic cold soups. Consommé can be served cold, in which case it takes the form of a jelly as a result of the natural gelatin present in the bony meats from which it is prepared.

      The basis of many soups is stock, or broth, a rich liquid obtained by boiling fish, meat, poultry, game, or vegetables. Clear broths can be garnished with separately cooked vegetables, pasta or rice, quenelles or dumplings, poached eggs, or other ingredients. Chinese egg-drop and Italian stracciatella are enriched with beaten eggs stirred in the hot broth.

 Thick soups may achieve their texture by means of a flour- or egg-thickened sauce or a puree of vegetables with or without butter or cream. Bisques and chowders (chowder) are creamy soups usually made with shellfish or fish, sometimes with meat or vegetables, and cream or milk. Gumbos (gumbo) are spicy soups originating in the Creole cooking of Louisiana that combine African, European, and American Indian elements. Substantial stewlike soups are found in rural cuisines worldwide. They often combine root vegetables, legumes, and smoked or fresh meats. Well-known examples are Italian minestrone, French garbure, Swedish ärter med flask (yellow peas and pork), and Dutch erwtensoep (split green peas).
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Soup — Soup, n. [F. soupe, OF. sope, supe, soupe, perhaps originally, a piece of bread; probably of Teutonic origin; cf. D. sop sop, G. suppe soup. See {Sop} something dipped in a liquid, and cf. {Supper}.] A liquid food of many kinds, usually made by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • soup — [so͞op] n. [Fr soupe < OFr, soup: see SUP2] 1. a liquid food, with or without solid particles, made by cooking meat, vegetables, fish, etc. in water, milk, or the like 2. Slang a heavy fog ☆ 3. Slang nitroglycerin ☆ from soup to nuts Informal… …   English World dictionary

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  • soup — ► NOUN ▪ a savoury liquid dish made by boiling meat, fish, or vegetables in stock or water. ► VERB (soup up) informal 1) increase the power and efficiency of (an engine). 2) make more elaborate or impressive. ● in the soup Cf. ↑in the soup …   English terms dictionary

  • soup|y — «SOO pee», adjective, soup|i|er, soup|i|est. like soup in consistency or appearance: »The weather was soupy and visibility was reduced (New Yorker) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Soup — Soup, v. t. To sup or swallow. [Obs.] Wyclif. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Soup — Soup, v. t. To breathe out. [Obs.] amden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Soup — Soup, v. t. To sweep. See {Sweep}, and {Swoop}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • soup up — (something) to make something more powerful. They had to soup up the air conditioning to keep her computers from overheating in the summer. Usage notes: usually used to describe an improvement to a car or other machine …   New idioms dictionary

  • soup — soup; soup·çon; …   English syllables

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