skene

skene1
/skee"nee/, n., pl. skenai /-nuy/.
(in the ancient Greek theater) a structure facing the audience and forming the background before which performances were given.
[ < Gk skené; see SCENE]
skene2
/skeen/, n.
skean.

* * *

In ancient Greek theatre, a building behind the playing area that was originally a hut in which actors changed masks and costumes.

It eventually became the scenic backdrop for the drama. First used с 465 BC, the skene was a small wooden structure facing the circle of spectators. It developed into a two-story edifice decorated with columns, with three doors used for entrances and exits. It was flanked by wings (paraskēnia). By the end of the 5th century BC, the wooden skene was replaced by a permanent stone structure. In the Roman theatre it was an elaborate building facade.

* * *

▪ ancient Greek theatre
      (from Greek skēnē, “scene-building”), in ancient Greek theatre, a building behind the playing area that was originally a hut for the changing of masks and costumes but eventually became the background before which the drama was enacted. First used c. 465 BC, the skene was originally a small wooden structure facing the circle of spectators. It developed into a two-story edifice decorated with columns, with three doors used for entrances and exits and the appearance of ghosts and gods; it was flanked by wings (paraskēnia). By the end of the 5th century BC, the wooden skene was replaced by a permanent stone structure. In the Roman theatre it was an elaborate building facade. The modern concept of the theatrical scene, which is an integral and functional part of the play, evolved from the Renaissance. In the ancient theatre the skene was merely a conventional background.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Skene —    SKENE, a parish, in the district and county of Aberdeen, 9 miles (W. by. N.) from the city of Aberdeen; containing 1846 inhabitants. This place, which is of some antiquity, was originally part of the royal forests of the kings of Scotland, and …   A Topographical dictionary of Scotland

  • Skene — bezeichnet Skene (Schweden), Ort in Schweden den Namen eines schottischen Clans den Namen einer altösterreichischen Unternehmerfamilie: siehe Skene (Familie) einen Begriff aus dem Theater: siehe Skene (Theater) Folgende Personen tragen den Namen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Skene — Skene, n. See {Skean}. C. Kingsley. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • skėnė — (gr.) sf.: Vaidybos užpakalyj stovėjo skėnė, tai esti trobelė, kur vaidintojai apsitaisydavo Vd …   Dictionary of the Lithuanian Language

  • Skene — (gr.), 1) das Zelt; 2) so v.w. Scene …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • skene — Celtic dagger, 1520s, from Ir. Gael. scian (gen. sceine) “knife.” …   Etymology dictionary

  • Skene — A Scottish tartan of red, navy, and green bars and green lines …   Dictionary of the English textile terms

  • skene — [skēn] n. var. of SKEAN …   English World dictionary

  • Skene — In classical drama, the skene was the background building which connected the platform stage, in which costumes were stored and to which the periaktoi (painted panels serving as the background) were connected.The evolution of the actor, who… …   Wikipedia

  • Skene — Ske|ne 〈[ ne:] f.; , Ske|nai; im altgrch. Theater〉 Bühnenhaus, aus dem die Schauspieler heraustraten, sowie die erhöhte Spielfläche davor für die Schauspieler (hinter der Orchestra) [grch., „Zelt, Hütte“] * * * Ske|ne, die; , …nai [griech.… …   Universal-Lexikon

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.