simple harmonic motion

vibratory motion in a system in which the restoring force is proportional to the displacement from equilibrium. Abbr.: S.H.M., s.h.m.

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Repetitive back-and-forth movement through a central, or equilibrium, position in which the maximum displacement on one side is equal to the maximum displacement on the other.

Each complete vibration takes the same time, the period; the reciprocal of the period is the frequency of vibration. The force that causes the motion is always directed toward the equilibrium position and is directly proportional to the distance from it. A pendulum displays simple harmonic motion; other examples include the electrons in a wire carrying alternating current and the vibrating particles of a medium carrying sound waves.

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      in physics, repetitive movement back and forth through an equilibrium, or central, position, so that the maximum displacement on one side of this position is equal to the maximum displacement on the other side. The time interval of each complete vibration is the same, and the force responsible for the motion is always directed toward the equilibrium position and is directly proportional to the distance from it.

      Many physical systems exhibit simple harmonic motion (assuming no energy loss): an oscillating pendulum, the electrons in a wire carrying alternating current, the vibrating particles of the medium in a sound wave, and other assemblages involving relatively small oscillations about a position of stable equilibrium.

      A specific example of a simple harmonic oscillator is the vibration of a mass attached to a vertical spring, the other end of which is fixed in a ceiling. At the maximum displacementx, the spring is under its greatest tension, which forces the mass upward. At the maximum displacement +x, the spring reaches its greatest compression, which forces the mass back downward again. At either position of maximum displacement, the force is greatest and is directed toward the equilibrium position, the velocity (v) of the mass is zero, its acceleration is at a maximum, and the mass changes direction. At the equilibrium position, the velocity is at its maximum and the acceleration (a) has fallen to zero. Simple harmonic motion is characterized by this changing acceleration that always is directed toward the equilibrium position and is proportional to the displacement from the equilibrium position. Furthermore, the interval of time for each complete vibration is constant and does not depend on the size of the maximum displacement. In some form, therefore, simple harmonic motion is at the heart of timekeeping.

      The motion is called harmonic because musical instruments make such vibrations that in turn cause corresponding sound waves in air. Musical sounds are actually a combination of many simple harmonic waves corresponding to the many ways in which the vibrating parts of a musical instrument oscillate in sets of superimposed simple harmonic motions, the frequencies of which are multiples of a lowest fundamental frequency. In fact, any regularly repetitive motion and any wave, no matter how complicated its form, can be treated as the sum of a series of simple harmonic motions or waves, a discovery first published in 1822 by the French mathematician Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (Fourier, Joseph, Baron).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • harmonic motion — /haˌmɒnɪk ˈmoʊʃən/ (say hah.monik mohshuhn) noun Physics See simple harmonic motion …   Australian English dictionary

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  • harmonic motion — noun Date: 1867 a periodic motion (as of a sounding violin string or swinging pendulum) that has a single frequency or amplitude or is composed of two or more such simple periodic motions …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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