Set


Set
/set/, n. Egyptian Relig.
the brother and murderer of Osiris, represented as having the form of a donkey or other mammal and regarded as personifying the desert.
Also, Seth.

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I
In mathematics and logic, any collection of objects (elements), which may be mathematical (e.g., numbers, functions) or not.

The intuitive idea of a set is probably even older than that of number. Members of a herd of animals, for example, could be matched with stones in a sack without members of either set actually being counted. The notion extends into the infinite. For example, the set of integers from 1 to 100 is finite, whereas the set of all integers is infinite. A set is commonly represented as a list of all its members enclosed in braces. A set with no members is called an empty, or null, set, and is denoted Ø. Because an infinite set cannot be listed, it is usually represented by a formula that generates its elements when applied to the elements of the set of counting numbers. Thus, {2x|x = 1,2,3,...} represents the set of positive even numbers (the vertical bar means "such that").
II
(as used in expressions)
Reduced Instruction Set Computing

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Set — (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root of E.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Set — (s[e^]t), v. i. 1. To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end. [1913 Webster] Ere the weary sun set in the west. Shak. [1913 Webster] Thus this century sets with little mirth, and the next is likely …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Set — has 464 separate definitions in the Oxford English Dictionary, the most of any English word; its full definition comprises 10,000 words making it the longest definition in the OED. Set may refer to:In mathematics and science:*Set (mathematics), a …   Wikipedia

  • Set — Set, n. 1. The act of setting, as of the sun or other heavenly body; descent; hence, the close; termination. Locking at the set of day. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] The weary sun hath made a golden set. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is set,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Set — (s[e^]t), a. 1. Fixed in position; immovable; rigid; as, a set line; a set countenance. [1913 Webster] 2. Firm; unchanging; obstinate; as, set opinions or prejudices. [1913 Webster] 3. Regular; uniform; formal; as, a set discourse; a set battle.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • set in — {v.} To begin; start; develop. * /Before the boat could reach shore, a storm had set in./ * /He did not keep the cut clean and infection set in./ * /The wind set in from the east./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • set to — {v.} 1. To make a serious beginning. * /Charlie took a helping of turkey, grabbed his knife and fork, and set to./ 2. To start to fight. * /One man called the other a liar and they set to./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • set to — {v.} 1. To make a serious beginning. * /Charlie took a helping of turkey, grabbed his knife and fork, and set to./ 2. To start to fight. * /One man called the other a liar and they set to./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Set — Set, prop. n. (Egyptian Mythology) An evil beast headed god with high square ears and a long snout; his was the brother and murderer of Osiris. Called also {Seth} [WordNet 1.6] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Set-to — n. A contest in boxing, in an argument, or the like. [Colloq.] Halliwell. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • set — I. verb (set; setting) Etymology: Middle English setten, from Old English settan; akin to Old High German sezzen to set, Old English sittan to sit Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to cause to sit ; place in or on a seat 2 …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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