pumice

pumiceous /pyooh mish"euhs/, adj.pumicer, n.
/pum"is/, n., v., pumiced, pumicing.
n.
1. Also called pumice stone. a porous or spongy form of volcanic glass, used as an abrasive.
v.t.
2. to rub, smooth, clean, etc., with pumice.
[bef. 1000; < L pumic-, s. of pumex pumice stone; r. ME pomis(e), pomish(e), pomice < MF pomis < L; cf. OE pumic- ( < L), in pumicstan pumice stone; see POUNCE3]

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Very porous, frothlike volcanic glass that has long been used as an abrasive in cleaning, polishing, and scouring compounds.

It is also used in precast masonry units, poured concrete, insulation and acoustic tile, and plaster. Pumice is igneous rock that cooled so rapidly there was no time for it to crystallize. When it solidified, the vapours dissolved in it were suddenly released, and the whole mass swelled up into a froth that immediately consolidated. Any type of lava may become pumiceous under favourable conditions.

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      a very porous, frothlike volcanic glass that has long been used as an abrasive in cleaning, polishing, and scouring compounds. It is also employed as a lightweight aggregate in precast masonry units, poured concrete, insulation and acoustic tile, and plaster.

      Pumice is pyroclastic igneous rock that was almost completely liquid at the moment of effusion and was so rapidly cooled that there was no time for it to crystallize. When it solidified, the vapours dissolved in it were suddenly released, the whole mass swelling up into a froth that immediately consolidated. Had it cooled under more pressure, it would have formed a solid glass, or obsidian; in fact, if fragments of obsidian are heated in a crucible until they fuse, they will change to pumice when their dissolved gases are set free. Any type of lava, if the conditions are favourable, may assume the pumiceous state, but basalts and andesite do not occur as often in this form as do trachytes (trachyte) and rhyolites (rhyolite).

      Small crystals of various minerals occur in many pumices; the most common are feldspar, augite, hornblende, and zircon. The cavities (vesicles) of pumice are sometimes rounded and may also be elongated or tubular, depending on the flow of the solidifying lava. In pumice occurring among old volcanic rocks, the cavities are usually filled with deposits of secondary minerals introduced by percolating water. The glass itself forms threads, fibres, and thin partitions between the vesicles. Rhyolite and trachyte pumices are white, andesite pumices often yellow or brown, and pumiceous basalts (such as occur in the Hawaiian Islands) pitch black.

      Pumices are most abundant and most typically developed from felsic (silica-rich) igneous rocks; accordingly, they commonly accompany obsidian. The major producers are countries that ring the Mediterranean, particularly Italy, Turkey, Greece, and Spain. In the United States it is mined mainly in Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast states.

      In minute fragments, it has an exceedingly wide distribution over the Earth's surface. It occurs in all the deposits that cover the floor of the deepest portion of the oceans and is especially abundant in the abyssal red clay. In some measure this pumice has been derived from submarine volcanic eruptions, but its presence is also accounted for by the fact that it will float on water for months and is thus distributed over the sea by winds and currents. After a long time it becomes waterlogged and sinks to the bottom, where it gradually disintegrates and is incorporated in the muds and oozes of the ocean floor.

      After the great eruption of Krakatoa in 1883, banks of pumice covered the surface of the sea for many kilometres and rose, in some cases, about 1.5 m (4 or 5 feet) above the water level. In addition, much finely broken pumice was thrown into the air to a great height and was borne away by the winds, ultimately settling in the most distant parts of the continents and oceans.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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