premenstrual syndrome

a complex of physical and emotional changes, including depression, irritability, appetite changes, bloating and water retention, breast soreness, and changes in muscular coordination, one or more of which may be experienced in the several days before the onset of menstrual flow. Abbr.: PMS Also called premenstrual tension.
[1980-85; PRE- + MENSTRUAL]

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      a medical condition in which a group of characteristic physical and emotional symptoms are felt by women before the onset of menstruation. The symptoms of PMS are cyclic in nature, generally beginning from 7 to 14 days before menstruation and ending within 24 hours after menstruation has begun. The medical condition was named by British physician Katharina Dalton in the 1950s.

      Research suggests that as many as 75 percent of females have PMS, and the types of symptoms and the degree of their severity vary markedly. Physical symptoms may include headache, cramps, backache, bloating, constipation or diarrhea, and a number of related disorders. The emotional and psychiatric symptoms of premenstrual syndrome range from irritability, lethargy, and rapid mood swings to hostility, confusion, aggression, and depression. Women who have severe symptoms of depression that are associated with premenstrual syndrome may be diagnosed with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). While premenstrual dysphoric disorder is closely related to major depressive disorder, the symptoms of severe depression are cyclical in nature, fluctuating with cycles of ovulation and menstruation. A distinguishing factor in the diagnosis of premenstrual dysphoric disorder is that depression eventually becomes so severe that home, work, and daily life are disrupted.

      Though they are the major subject of current research, the causes of PMS are not yet established. The most widely accepted theories centre on hormonal (sex hormone) changes (the rapid fluctuation of levels of estrogen and progesterone in the bloodstream), nutritional (nutrition, human) deficiencies (particularly in regard to the vitamins—notably B vitamins—that affect nerve transmission in the brain), and stress (which has been shown to be a factor in the severity of symptoms). Many researchers suspect that fluctuations of chemical transmitters in the brain are largely responsible. Several genetic mutations have been identified that may increase a woman's predisposition toward developing premenstrual syndrome or toward developing the severe depression that is associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

      For purposes of treatment (therapeutics), a chart that records the nature and date of occurrence of a woman's symptoms can aid diagnosis. The major method of treatment for most cases of PMS involves some combination of regular physical exercise, avoidance of stress, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen or naproxen sodium, and hormone therapy. Restriction of sodium intake, avoidance of xanthines—found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and cola—and eating foods high in protein and complex carbohydrates are a few of the dietary measures that can be taken to reduce much of the physical discomfort. Women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder usually require antidepressant medications.

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Universalium. 2010.

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