pogrom

/peuh grum", -grom", poh-/, n.
an organized massacre, esp. of Jews.
[1880-85; ( < Yiddish) < Russ pogróm lit., destruction, devastation (of a town, country, etc., as in war), n. deriv. of pogromít', equiv. to po- perfective prefix + gromít' to destroy, devastate, deriv. of grom thunder]
Syn. slaughter, butchery.

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I

Mob attack, condoned by authorities, against persons and property of a religious, racial, or national minority.

The term is usually applied to attacks on Jews in Russia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. After the assassination of Tsar Alexander II (1881), false rumours associating Jews with the murder aroused Russian mobs in more than 200 cities and towns to attack Jews and destroy their property. Mob attacks diminished in the 1890s, but they again became common in 1903–06. Although the government did not organize pogroms, its anti-Semitic policy (1881–1917) and reluctance to stop the attacks led many anti-Semites to believe that their violence was legitimate. Pogroms also occurred in Poland and in Germany during Adolf Hitler's regime.
II
(as used in expressions)

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▪ mob attack
      (Russian: “devastation,” or “riot”), a mob attack, either approved or condoned by authorities, against the persons and property of a religious, racial, or national minority. The term is usually applied to attacks on Jews (Jew) in the Russian Empire in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

      The first extensive pogroms followed the assassination of Tsar Alexander II in 1881. Although the assassin was not a Jew, and only one Jew was associated with him, false rumours aroused Russian mobs in more than 200 cities and towns to attack Jews and destroy their property. In the two decades following, pogroms gradually became less prevalent; but from 1903 to 1906 they were common throughout the country. Thereafter, to the end of the Russian monarchy, mob action against the Jews was intermittent and less widespread.

      The pogrom in Kishinev (now Chisinau) in Russian-ruled Moldavia in April 1903, although more severe than most, was typical in many respects. For two days mobs, inspired by local leaders acting with official support, killed, looted, and destroyed without hindrance from police or soldiers. When troops were finally called out and the mob dispersed, 45 Jews had been killed, nearly 600 had been wounded, and 1,500 Jewish homes had been pillaged. Those responsible for inciting the outrages were not punished.

      The Russian central government did not organize pogroms, as was widely believed; but the anti-Semitic policy that it carried out from 1881 to 1917 made them possible. Official persecution and harassment of Jews led the numerous anti-Semites to believe that their violence was legitimate, and their belief was strengthened by the active participation of a few high and many minor officials in fomenting attacks and by the reluctance of the government either to stop pogroms or to punish those responsible for them.

      Pogroms have also occurred in other countries, notably in Poland and in Germany during the Hitler regime. See also anti-Semitism; Kristallnacht.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • pogrom — (n.) 1882, from Yiddish pogrom, from Rus. pogromu devastation, destruction, from po by, through + gromu thunder, roar, from PIE imitative root *ghrem (see GRIM (Cf. grim)) …   Etymology dictionary

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  • pogrom — → pogromo …   Diccionario panhispánico de dudas

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