Platonic solid

one of the five regular polyhedrons: tetrahedron, octahedron, hexahedron, icosahedron, or dodecahedron.
[1950-55]

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also known as regular polyhedron

Geometric solid all of whose faces are identical regular polygons and all of whose angles are equal.

There are only five such polyhedrons. The cube is constructed from the square, the dodecahedron from the regular pentagon, and the tetrahedron, octahedron, and icosahedron (with 20 faces) from the equilateral triangle. They are known as the Platonic solids because of Plato's attempt to relate each to one of the five elements that he believed formed the world.

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      any of the five geometric solids whose faces are all identical, regular polygons meeting at the same three-dimensional angles. Also known as the five regular polyhedra, they consist of the tetrahedron (or pyramid), cube, octahedron, dodecahedron, and icosahedron. Pythagoras (c. 580–c. 500 BC) probably knew the tetrahedron, cube, and dodecahedron. According to Euclid (fl. c. 300 BC), the octahedron and icosahedron were first discussed by the Athenian mathematician Theaetetus (c. 417–369 BC). However, the entire group of regular polyhedra owes its popular name to the great Athenian philosopher Plato (428/427–348/347 BC), who in his dialogue Timaeus associated them with the four basic elements—fire, air, water, and earth—that he supposed to form all matter through their combinations. Plato assigned the tetrahedron, with its sharp points and edges, to the element fire; the cube, with its four-square regularity, to earth; and the other solids concocted from triangles (the octahedron and the icosahedron) to air and water, respectively. The one remaining regular polyhedra, the dodecahedron, with 12 pentagonal faces, Plato assigned to the heavens with its 12 constellations. Because of Plato's systematic development of a theory of the universe based on the five regular polyhedra, they became known as the Platonic solids.

      Euclid devoted the last book of the Elements to the regular polyhedra, which thus serve as so many capstones to his geometry. In particular, his is the first known proof that exactly five regular polyhedra exist. Almost 2,000 years later the astronomer Johannes Kepler (Kepler, Johannes) (1571–1630) resuscitated the idea of using the Platonic solids to explain the geometry of the universe in his first model of the cosmos. The symmetry, structural integrity, and beauty of these solids have inspired architects, artists, and artisans from ancient Egypt to the present.

J.L. Heilbron
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Platonic — adjective Of or relating to the ancient Greek philosopher Plato or his philosophies. See Also: Plato, Platonically, Platonism, Platonist, Platonistic, Platonic body, Platonic hydrocarbon, Platonic solid …   Wiktionary

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