plaster

plasterer, n.plasteriness, n.plasterlike, plastery, adj.
/plas"teuhr, plah"steuhr/, n.
1. a composition, as of lime or gypsum, sand, water, and sometimes hair or other fiber, applied in a pasty form to walls, ceilings, etc., and allowed to harden and dry.
2. powdered gypsum.
4. a solid or semisolid preparation spread upon cloth, plastic, or other material and applied to the body, esp. for some healing purpose.
v.t.
5. to cover (walls, ceilings, etc.) with plaster.
6. to treat with gypsum or plaster of Paris.
7. to lay flat like a layer of plaster.
8. to daub or fill with plaster or something similar.
9. to apply a plaster to (the body, a wound, etc.).
10. to overspread with something, esp. thickly or excessively: a wall plastered with posters.
11. Informal.
a. to defeat decisively; trounce; drub.
b. to knock down or injure, as by a blow or beating.
c. to inflict serious damage or injury on by heavy bombing, shelling, or other means of attack.
[bef. 1000; ME, OE < ML plastrum plaster (both medical and building senses), aph. var. of L emplastrum < Gk émplastron salve, alter. of émplaston, neut. of émplastos daubed; see EM-2, -PLAST]

* * *

      a pasty composition (as of lime or gypsum, water, and sand) that hardens on drying and is used for coating walls, ceilings, and partitions.

      Plastering is one of the most ancient building techniques. Evidence indicates that primitive peoples plastered their reed or sapling shelters with mud, thus developing more durable structures and more effective screens against vermin and inclement weather. More lasting and sightly materials in time replaced mud. Some of the earliest plastering extant is of a quality comparable to that used in modern times. The Pyramids of Egypt contain plasterwork executed at least 4,000 years ago that is still hard and durable. The principal tools of the plasterer of that time were in design and purpose like those used today. For their finest work the Egyptians used a plaster made from calcined gypsum that is identical with plaster of paris.

      Very early in the history of Greek architecture (e.g., at Mycenae), plaster of a fine white lime stucco was used. Greek artisans had achieved high quality earlier than the 5th century BC. Plaster was frequently used to cover the exteriors of temples, a technique commonly known as stucco (stuccowork), in addition to covering the interiors, in some cases even when the building was made of marble.

 The ornamental plaster ceilings of England during the reigns of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and James I still are admired. Earlier extant specimens of the plasterers' skill in England are the pargeted and ornamented fronts of half-timbered houses.

      Plaster as a medium of artistic expression waned by the 19th century, when imitation and mechanical reproduction displaced this creative art. As a surface material for interior walls and ceilings and to a lesser degree for exterior walls, plaster remains in common use. It facilitates cleanliness and sanitation in building and is a retardant to the spread of fire.

      Interior plasterwork is designed according to the type of lathing to which it is applied and the number of applications that are necessary. Ornamental plaster for ceilings and cornices is usually applied with a metal molding tool that has the reverse of the desired profile. Some elements may be formed by hand, while others are precast and stuck in place with plaster of paris. Stucco may be applied directly to concrete, brick, tile, or a supporting metal lath base. Various types of finish, including colours and textures, may be incorporated in the finish coat. Splatter dash and pebble dash are textured surfaces resulting from throwing mortar or pebble with some force on the finish coat while it is still soft.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Plaster — Plas ter, n. [AS., a plaster (in sense 1), fr. L. emplastrum, Gr. ?, ?, fr. ? to daub on, stuff in; ? in + ? to mold: cf. OF. plastre a plaster (in sense 2), F. pl[^a]tre. Cf. {Plastic}, {Emplaster}, {Piaster}.] [Formerly written also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • plaster — [plas′tər, pläs′tər] n. [ME < OE plaster & OFr plastre, both < LL plastrum, for L emplastrum < Gr emplastron, plaster < emplassein, to daub over < en, on, in + plassein, to form: see PLASTIC] 1. a pasty mixture, as of lime or… …   English World dictionary

  • Plaster — Promo Linkin Park Дата выпуска 2000 Жанр Рок Лейбл Warner Brothers Records …   Википедия

  • plaster — {{/stl 13}}{{stl 8}}rz. mnż I, D. plastertra, Mc. plastertrze {{/stl 8}}{{stl 20}} {{/stl 20}}{{stl 12}}1. {{/stl 12}}{{stl 7}} kawałek tkaniny pokryty z jednej strony środkiem leczniczym i substancją klejącą, utrzymującą go na skórze; też:… …   Langenscheidt Polski wyjaśnień

  • Plaster — Plas ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Plastered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Plastering}.] [Cf. OF. plastrer to plaster (in sense 2), F. pl[^a]trer.] 1. To cover with a plaster, as a wound or sore. [1913 Webster] 2. To overlay or cover with plaster, as the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • plaster — ► NOUN 1) a soft mixture of lime with sand or cement and water for spreading on walls and ceilings to form a smooth hard surface when dried. 2) (also plaster of Paris) a hard white substance made by adding water to powdered gypsum, used for… …   English terms dictionary

  • plaster — [n] thick, gooey material that hardens adhesive, binding, cement, coat, dressing, glue, gum, gypsum, lime, mortar, mucilage, paste, plaster of Paris, stucco; concepts 466,475 plaster [v] spread, smear adhere, bedaub, besmear, bind, cement, coat,… …   New thesaurus

  • plaster — na rany «coś, co przynosi pociechę, ulgę»: Każde twoje ciepłe słowo to dla mnie plaster na rany, uwierz mi. Roz tel 2002 …   Słownik frazeologiczny

  • plaster — The verb has inflected forms plastered, plastering …   Modern English usage

  • Plaster — The term plaster can refer to plaster of Paris, lime plaster, or cement plaster. This article deals mainly with plaster of Paris.Plaster of Paris is a type of building material based on calcium sulfate hemihydrate, nominally CaSO4·0.5H2O. It is… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.