pavement

pavemental /payv men"tl/, adj.
/payv"meuhnt/, n.
1. a paved road, highway, etc.
2. a paved surface, ground covering, or floor.
3. a material used for paving.
4. Atlantic States and Brit. sidewalk.
5. pound the pavement, Informal. to walk the streets in order to accomplish something: If you're going to find work you'd better start pounding the pavement.
[1250-1300; ME < OF < L pavimentum. See PAVE, -MENT]

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Durable surfacing of a road, path, court, patio, plaza, airstrip, or other such area.

The Romans, the greatest road builders of the ancient world, built their roads of stone and concrete. By AD 75 several methods of road construction were known in India, including brick and stone slab pavements, and street paving was common in towns. Smaller cobblestones began to be used for European paving in the late Middle Ages. The 18th–19th century saw the development of pavement systems (e.g., macadam) that used light road surfaces of broken or crushed stone. Modern flexible pavements contain sand and gravel or crushed stone compacted with a bituminous binder (e.g., asphalt or tar); such a pavement has enough plasticity to absorb shock. Rigid pavements are made of concrete, composed of coarse and fine aggregate and portland cement, and usually reinforced with steel rod or mesh.

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▪ American band
      American band whose foppish lyrics and punk-derived sonic textures merged into a free-floating poetry of reference that epitomized 1990s college rock. The original members were lead singer, guitarist, and principal songwriter Stephen Malkmus (also known as S.M.; b. May 30 1966, Santa Monica, Calif., U.S.) and guitarist Scott Kannberg (also known as Spiral Stairs; b. Aug. 30, 1966, Stockton, Calif.). Manic original drummer Gary Young (b. c. 1954 , Marmaroneck, N.Y.), a counterculture veteran who ran the studio where Pavement initially recorded, was replaced by Steve West (b. 1967, , Richmond, Va.) in 1993. Percussionist Bob Nastanovichb. Aug. 27, 1967, Rochester, N.Y.) and bassist Mark Ibold (b. 1967, Cincinnati, Ohio) joined in 1991 and 1990, respectively.

      Formed in Stockton, Calif., in 1989, Pavement was among the first musical groups to come of age inside the “indie” rock subculture, forming their musical identities by listening to R.E.M. and collecting obscure records on small labels. Its first releases, later compiled into the 1993 album Westing (by Musket and Sextant), offered compressed snippets of industrial sound and shards of surprisingly melodic low-fi pop (from low fidelity; music made with rudimentary recording equipment such as four-track tapes). But Slanted and Enchanted (1992) revealed a new grandeur, with enigmatic anthems of subcultural devotion such as “Summer Babe” and “In the Mouth a Desert” treating the slacker life as a birthright. Malkmus's forever puzzled, laid-back persona (priding himself on coasting) recast punk: instead of rebellion, Pavement emphasized the enchantments of rarefied self-expression.

      Even so, the commercial breakthrough of alternative rock with Nirvana's Nevermind (1991) proved too obvious a target for Malkmus to resist, and 1994's Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain sniped at groups such as the Smashing Pumpkins and the Stone Temple Pilots, while also slicking up the pop enough to get Pavement some exposure with the “Cut Your Hair” music video. But instead of further pursuing what Malkmus called “gold soundz,” Pavement's next album, Wowee Zowee! (1995), spurned the Lollapalooza (see Rock Topics: rock festivals) audience with sophisticated experimental jams. The subsequent Brighten the Corners (1997) and Terror Twilight (1999) were lyrical and contained elements that increasingly foreshadowed Malkmus's desire for a solo career. Malkmus announced the dissolution of Pavement in the fall of 2000, and he released his eponymous debut album in February 2001, followed by Pig Lib (2003), Face the Truth (2005), and Real Emotional Trash (2008), all with his new assemblage, the Jicks, who by 2008 included former Sleater-Kinney drummer Janet Weiss. Weiss, like Malkmus, lived in Portland, Ore., where slacker collegiate types had bought homes and become parents. Even before the breakup of Pavement, Malkmus and Nastanovich had begun a side project with David Berman, recording as Silver Jews. Kannberg's post-Pavement band, Preston School of Industry, proved less interesting than either of Malkmus's groups.

Eric M. Weisbard
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pavement — [ pavmɑ̃ ] n. m. • 1156; de paver, d apr. lat. pavimentum 1 ♦ Sol pavé. ⇒ pavage, 1. pavé; dallage. Pavement en grès d un chemin. Un pavement de mosaïque. 2 ♦ (1483) Vieilli Travail qui consiste à paver. ⇒ pavage. ● pavement nom masculin ( …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Pavement — may refer to:* Pavement (material), the durable surfacing of roads and walkways ( road surface in British English) * Sidewalk, a walkway along the side of a road, in American English ( pavement in British English and Philadelphia dialect) *… …   Wikipedia

  • Pavement — à Shibuya (Tokyo) Pays d’origine Stockton, Californie …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Pavement — Пэйвмент Основн …   Википедия

  • Pavement — Pave ment, n. [F., fr. LL. pavamentum, L. pavimentum. See {Pave}.] That with which anythingis paved; a floor or covering of solid material, laid so as to make a hard and convenient surface for travel; a paved road or sidewalk; a decorative… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pavement — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Pavement Información personal Origen Stockton, California, EE. UU. Estado Disueltos Información artística …   Wikipedia Español

  • Pavement — 1993 Allg …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Pavement — Pave ment, v. t. To furnish with a pavement; to pave. [Obs.] How richly pavemented! Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pavement — Pavement, Pauimentatio. Pavement fait de petites pieces de marbre, Marmoratio …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • pavement — (n.) late 13c., from O.Fr. paviment, from L. pavimentum beaten floor, from pavire (see PAVE (Cf. pave)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • pavement — means ‘a paved way for pedestrians’ in BrE (corresponding to AmE sidewalk) and in parts of the American east coast, and the hard surface of a paved road elsewhere in America …   Modern English usage

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