paddlefish

/pad"l fish'/, n., pl. paddlefishes, (esp. collectively) paddlefish.
a large ganoid fish, Polyodon spathula, of the Mississippi River and its larger tributaries, having a long, flat, paddlelike snout.
[1680-90, Amer.; PADDLE1 + FISH]

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Either of two species (family Polyodontidae) of archaic freshwater fishes with a paddlelike snout, wide mouth, smooth skin, and cartilaginous skeleton.

It feeds with mouth gaping open, gill rakers straining plankton from the water. The American paddlefish, or spoonbill (Polyodon spathula), is greenish or gray and averages 40 lbs (18 kg); it lives in the open waters of the Mississippi basin. The other known species (Psephurus gladius), a larger fish with a more slender snout, inhabits the Chang (Yangtze) River basin. The flesh of both species resembles catfish; the roe can be made into caviar.

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fish
also called  Duckbill Cat,  

      either of two species of archaic freshwater fish with a paddle-like snout, wide mouth, smooth skin, and cartilaginous skeleton. A relative of the sturgeon, the paddlefish is of the family Polyodontidae and the order Acipenseriformes. It feeds with mouth gaping open, gill rakers straining plankton from the water.

 The American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula; see photograph—>), also called spoonbill, is greenish or gray and averages about 18 kilograms (40 pounds). It lives in open waters of the Mississippi Basin. The other known species (Psephurus gladius), a larger fish with more slender snout, inhabits the Yangtse River Basin. The flesh of both species is somewhat like catfish; the roe can be made into caviar.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • paddlefish — ☆ paddlefish [pad′ lfish΄ ] n. pl. paddlefish or paddlefishes (see FISH) any of a family (Polyodontidae, order Acipenseriformes) of large bony fishes of the Mississippi and Chang rivers, with a paddle shaped snout …   English World dictionary

  • Paddlefish — Pad dle*fish , n. (Zo[ o]l) A large ganoid fish ({Polyodon spathula}) found in the rivers of the Mississippi Valley. It has a long spatula shaped snout. Called also {duck billed cat}, and {spoonbill sturgeon}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Paddlefish — Taxobox name = Paddlefishes image width = 250px image caption = American Paddlefish, Polyodon spathula regnum = Animalia phylum = Chordata classis = Actinopterygii ordo = Acipenseriformes familia = Polyodontidae subdivision ranks = Species… …   Wikipedia

  • paddlefish — /ˈpædlfɪʃ/ (say padlfish) noun (plural paddlefish or paddlefishes) a large ganoid fish, Polyodon spathula, remotely allied to the sturgeons, with a long, flat, paddle like projection of the snout, abundant in the Mississippi and its larger… …   Australian English dictionary

  • paddlefish — amerikinis irklanosis statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas taksono rangas rūšis atitikmenys: lot. Polyodon spathula angl. paddlefish; spadefish rus. веслонос ryšiai: platesnis terminas – amerikiniai irklanosiai …   Žuvų pavadinimų žodynas

  • paddlefish — noun Date: 1807 any of a family (Polyodontidae) of ganoid fishes; especially a large food fish (Polyodon spathula) of the Mississippi River valley with a long paddle shaped snout and with roe used in caviar …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • paddlefish — noun Any of several primitive fish, of the family Polyodontidae, that have a long snout shaped like a paddle …   Wiktionary

  • paddlefish — n. large freshwater fish having long paddle shaped snout (inhabitant of the Mississippi River and its streams and the Yangtze River) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • paddlefish — noun (plural same or paddlefishes) a large fish related to the sturgeon, with an elongated snout. [Polyodon spathula (Mississippi basin) and Psephurus gladius (Yangtze River).] …   English new terms dictionary

  • paddlefish — pad•dle•fish [[t]ˈpæd lˌfɪʃ[/t]] n. pl. fish•es, (esp. collectively) fish. ich a large fish, Polyodon spathula, of the Mississippi River and its larger tributaries, having a long, flat, paddlelike snout • Etymology: 1680–90, amer …   From formal English to slang

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