Nicholas I

1. Saint ("Nicholas the Great"), died A.D. 867, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 858-867.
2. 1796-1855, czar of Russia 1825-55.

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Russian Nikolay Pavlovich

born July 6, 1796, Tsarkoye Selo, near St. Petersburg, Russia
died March 2, 1855, St. Petersburg

Tsar of Russia (1825–55).

He was the son of Paul I and was trained as an army officer. In 1825 he succeeded his brother Alexander I as emperor and suppressed the Decembrist revolt. His reign came to represent autocracy, militarism, and bureaucracy. To enforce his policies, he created such agencies as the Third Section (political police). In foreign policy, Nicholas quelled an uprising in Poland (1830–31) and aided Austria against a Hungarian uprising (1849). His designs on Constantinople led to war with Turkey (1853) and drew other European powers into the Crimean War. He was succeeded by his son Alexander II.

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▪ Byzantine patriarch of Constantinople
byname  Nicholas Mystikos  
born 852, Constantinople
died May 15, 925

      Byzantine patriarch of Constantinople (901–907; 912–925), who contributed measurably to the attempted reunion of the Greek and Roman churches and who fomented the tetragamy controversy, or the question of a fourth marriage for the Eastern Orthodox.

      A close associate of the controversial patriarch Photius of Constantinople, Nicholas began his career in the Byzantine civil service but became a monk when Photius was deposed in 886. Named a secretary counsellor (Mystikos) by the emperor Leo VI (886–912), Nicholas was appointed patriarch of Constantinople in 901. Having refused on grounds of religious legality and propriety to grant the Emperor's request for a dispensation to contract a fourth marriage after the death of his third wife, and declining to consult Pope Sergius III in the matter, Nicholas was banished to a monastery outside Constantinople. Recalled either by Leo in the last year of his reign, or by Emperor Alexander (912–913), Nicholas was invited to act as regent for Prince Constantine VII.

      Because of his harsh retaliation against patriarch Euthymius, his successor during exile, Nicholas alienated many of the clergy and people, among them Leo's family, creating a rivalry between their respective supporters. During the rule of the emperor Romanus I Lecapenus (920–944), Nicholas was reconciled with Patriarch Euthymius, thus ending the bitter internal struggle within the Eastern Orthodox Church. Nicholas' negotiations with Pope John X (914–928) concerning cooperative union between Eastern and Western Christendom and an agreement over the ecclesiastical law of marriage for the Eastern Church inaugurated a rare period of harmony. In a synod (920) Nicholas issued a decree of union settling the tetragamy question by ordinarily limiting Greek Christians to three marriages but validating the fourth marriage of Leo VI for the good of the state in order to settle the imperial line of succession by a legitimate heir.

      Nicholas also engaged in various diplomatic affairs, as is evidenced by his letters on Byzantine–Bulgarian relations and concerning questions of Greek estates in Italy. He is revered as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church.

▪ king of Montenegro
Montenegrin in full  Nikola Petrović  
born Oct. 7 [Sept. 25, old style], 1841, Njegoš, Montenegro
died March 2, 1921, Antibes, Fr.

      prince (1860–1910) and then king (1910–18) of Montenegro, who transformed his small principality into a sovereign European nation.

      Heir presumptive to his uncle Danilo II, who was childless, Nicholas came to the throne in August 1860 after Danilo's assassination. Educated abroad in Paris and Trieste, he was throughout his reign faced with the difficult task of popularizing Western ways. A strong prince and an outstanding leader, he fought the Turks in 1862 and again in 1876, when he conducted a brilliant campaign. At the Congress of Berlin (1878), Montenegro was doubled in size, with an outlet to the Adriatic, and recognized as a sovereign state. Alexander II of Russia, whose friendship with Nicholas dated back to a state visit to St. Petersburg in 1868, supplied him regularly with money and arms and at one point favoured his candidacy for the Serbian throne. A clever diplomat, Nicholas strengthened his dynastic connections through the marriages of his daughters: Elena married (1896) the future king of Italy, Victor Emmanuel III; Zorka married Peter Karadjordjević (1883) but died before he became king of Serbia; two other daughters married Russian grand dukes. In Balkan politics Nicholas conspired, sometimes with, and sometimes against, Serbian rulers, to create a South Slav state.

      Styling himself “Royal Highness” (December 1900), Nicholas became more despotic until he was forced to grant a constitution in 1905. Political dissension, nevertheless, continued, culminating in the Cetinje bomb plot against him (1907). On Aug. 28, 1910, Nicholas declared himself king. Hoping to gain prestige through the addition of new territories, he joined in the Balkan War of 1912–13 against Turkey; but his territorial acquisitions were disappointing. In World War I he supported Serbia against Austria-Hungary. Defeated, he concluded a separate peace in January 1916 and then went into exile in Italy. When the victorious Serbs entered Montenegro after the defeat of Austria-Hungary, Nicholas and his dynasty were formally deposed by a national assembly (Nov. 26, 1918), and Montenegro was joined to Serbia, later to become part of the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (Yugoslavia).

▪ tsar of Russia
Introduction
Russian  in full Nikolay Pavlovich  
born July 6 [June 25, old style], 1796, Tsarskoye Selo [now Pushkin], near St. Petersburg, Russia
died March 2 [Feb. 18, O.S.], 1855, St. Petersburg
 Russian emperor (1825–55), often considered the personification of classic autocracy; for his reactionary policies, he has been called the emperor who froze Russia for 30 years.

Early life.
      Nicholas was the son of Grand Duke Paul and Grand Duchess Maria. Some three and a half months after his birth, following the death of Catherine II the Great, Nicholas' father became Emperor Paul I of Russia. Nicholas had three brothers, two of whom, the future emperor Alexander I and Constantine (Constantine, Veliky Knyaz), were 19 and 17 years older than he. It was the third, Michael, his junior by two years, and a sister, Anne, who became his childhood companions and intimate lifelong friends.

      Paul was extremely neurotic, overbearing, and despotic. Yet it is believed that he showed kindness and consideration to his younger children and that, in fact, he loved and cherished them tenderly. He was killed in a palace revolution of 1801, which made Alexander emperor when Nicholas was not quite five years old. Maria, on the contrary, remained formal and cold in her relationship to the children, very much in keeping with her general character. She belonged, apparently, among those human beings who combine numerous conventional virtues with a certain rigidity and lack of warmth. In the words of a competent observer: “The only failing of this extraordinary woman was her being excessively, one may say, exacting of her children and of the people dependent on her.”

Education.
      The future emperor's first guardian and instructor was a Scottish nurse, Jane Lyon, who was appointed by Catherine II to care for the infant and who stayed with Nicholas constantly during the first seven years of his life. From Lyon the young grand duke learned even such things as the Russian alphabet, his first Russian prayers, and his hatred of the Poles (at least he liked later to trace the origin of his bitter antipathy toward that people to the stories told by his nurse about her painful experience in Warsaw in the turbulent year of 1794).

      In 1802–03 men replaced women in Nicholas' entourage, and his regular education began. As directed by Gen. Matthew Lamsdorff, it emphasized severe discipline and formalism. The growing grand duke studied French and German as well as Russian, world history, and general geography in French, together with the history and geography of Russia. Religion, drawing, arithmetic, geometry, algebra, and physics were added to the curriculum. Nicholas received instruction also in dancing, music, singing, and horseback riding and was introduced at an early age to the theatre, costume balls, and other court entertainment.

      A more advanced curriculum went into effect in 1809, with courses ranging from political economy, logic, moral philosophy, and natural law to strategy. English, Latin, and Greek were added to the language program. Though, on the whole, a belief that Nicholas had not been trained for his role of Russian sovereign is wrong, he did profit little from the instruction, which he found rigid and tedious. He loved only military science, becoming a fine army engineer and expert in several other areas of military knowledge. Moreover, he always remained in his heart a dedicated junior officer.

      Circumstances also favoured militarism. Nicholas' education, as well as that of his younger brother, was interrupted and largely terminated by the great struggles against Napoleon in 1812–15. The grand dukes were allowed to join the army in 1814, and, although they saw no actual fighting, they lived through the heady emotions of those momentous years and also enjoyed the opportunities to stay in Paris and other places in western and central Europe. On Nov. 4, 1815, at a state dinner in Berlin, Alexander I and King Frederick William III rose to announce the engagement of Nicholas and Princess Charlotte of Prussia (Alexandra, after she became Orthodox).

      The solemn wedding followed some 20 months later, on July 13, 1817. The match represented a dynastic and political arrangement sought by both reigning houses, which had stood together in the decisive years against Napoleon and after that at the Congress of Vienna—the peace settlement following the Napoleonic Wars—and it proved singularly successful. Not only was Nicholas in love with his wife, but he became very closely attached to his father-in-law as well as to his royal brothers, one of whom was later to be his fellow ruler as King Frederick William IV. Beyond that, Nicholas was powerfully attracted by the Prussian court and even more so by the Prussian Army. He felt remarkably happy and at home in his adopted family and country, which for many years he tried to visit as often as he could.

      To complete his training, Grand Duke Nicholas was sent on two educational voyages—an extensive tour of Russia that lasted from May to September in 1816 and a journey to England, where the future emperor spent four months late that same year and early in 1817. The Russian trip covered much ground at great speed and was quite superficial, but it has interest for the historian because of the notes that Nicholas, following the instructions of his mother, took on everything seen and heard. The grand duke's observations deal, typically, with appearances rather than with causes and reflect a number of his prejudices, including his bitter dislike of Poles and Jews. Such quick inspection tours later became almost an obsession of the Emperor.

      In England, Nicholas stayed mostly in London, although he travelled to a score of other places. While he did attend the opening of the houses of Parliament and in general obtained some knowledge of English politics, his only recorded comments on that score were unfavourable. The future emperor found it much more congenial to examine military and naval centres. His favourite English companion was the Duke of Wellington. Less than a year after his return to Russia and a few months after his marriage, Nicholas was appointed inspector general of the army corps of engineers. In subsequent years he held several other military positions but of secondary significance.

Ascension to the throne.
      Alexander I's unexpected death in southern Russia on Dec. 1, 1825, led to a dynastic crisis. Because Alexander I had no direct male successor, Constantine was next in line for the throne. But the heir presumptive had married a Polish woman not of royal blood in 1820 and renounced his rights to the crown. Nicholas was thus to become the next ruler of Russia, the entire matter being stated, in 1822, in a manifesto confirmed with Alexander I's signature. But the manifesto remained unpublished, and Nicholas questioned the legal handling of the whole issue and the reaction in the country, which expected Constantine to succeed Alexander. In any case, Constantine and the Polish kingdom of which he was commander in chief swore allegiance to Nicholas, but Nicholas, the Russian capital, and the Russian Army swore allegiance to Constantine.

      It was only after Constantine's unyielding reaffirmation of his position and the resulting lapse of time that Nicholas decided to publish Alexander's manifesto and become emperor of Russia. On Dec. 26, 1825 (Dec. 14, O.S.), when the guard regiments in St. Petersburg were to swear allegiance for the second time in rapid succession, this time to Nicholas, liberal conspirators staged what came to be known as the Decembrist Rebellion. Utilizing their influence in the army, in which many of them were officers, they started a mutiny in several units, which they entreated to defend the rightful interests of Constantine (Constantine, Veliky Knyaz) against his usurping brother. Altogether some 3,000 misled rebels marched in military formation to the Senate Square—now the Decembrist Square—in the heart of the capital. Although the rebellion had failed by nightfall, it meant that Nicholas I ascended the throne over the bodies of some of his subjects and in actual combat with the dreaded revolution.

Personality.
      Nicholas I has come down in history as the classic autocrat, in appearance and manner as much as in behaviour and policy. To quote Andrew Dickson White (White, Andrew Dickson), a United States diplomat:

With his height of more than six feet, his head always held high, a slightly aquiline nose, a firm and well-formed mouth under a light moustache, a square chin, an imposing, domineering, set face, noble rather than tender, monumental rather than human, he had something of Apollo and of Jupiter . . . Nicholas was unquestionably the most handsome man in Europe.

      Or to refer to Adolphe, marquis de Custine, whose lasting literary fame rests on his denunciation of the Russia of Nicholas I: “Virgil's Neptune . . . one could not be more emperor than he.” In short, Nicholas I came to represent autocracy personified: infinitely majestic, determined and powerful, hard as stone, and relentless as fate. Yet, on closer acquaintance, the other side of the Emperor emerged. The detachment and the superior calm of an autocrat, which Nicholas I tried so often and so hard to display, were essentially a false front. The sovereign's insistence on firmness and stern action was based on fear, not on confidence; his determination concealed a state approaching panic, and his courage fed on something akin to despair. Nicholas' violent hatred could concentrate apparently with equal ease on an individual, such as the French king Louis-Philippe; a group, such as the Decembrists; a people, such as the Poles; or a concept, such as revolution. His impulse was always to strike and keep striking until the object of his wrath was destroyed.

      Aggressiveness, however, was not the Emperor's only method of coping with the problems of life. He also used regimentation, orderliness, neatness, and precision, an enormous effort to have everything at all times in its proper place. Nicholas I was by nature a drill master and an inspector general; the army remained his love, almost an obsession, from childhood to the end of his life. But, in every other sphere of activity and existence too, the Emperor insisted on minute and precise regulation, with nothing to be left to chance. Position, circumstances, and his own character placed an almost intolerable burden on his shoulders. Still, he managed to carry it for three decades, sustained by his overwhelming sense of duty and devotion to hard work, by his sincere religious convictions, and by his family. His outlook, however, became ever more pessimistic and fatalistic, until in the disaster of the Crimean War the autocrat declared simply: “I shall carry my cross until all my strength is gone.” “Thy will be done.”

Ideology.
      Nicholas' views fitted his personality to perfection. In contrast to Alexander I, he had been brought up at the time of wars against Napoleon and of reaction, which he accepted wholeheartedly as his own cause. Eventually the Russian wing of European reaction, represented by Nicholas I and his government, found its ideological expression in the doctrine of so-called Official Nationality.

      Formally proclaimed in 1833 by Count Sergey Uvarov (Uvarov, Sergey Semyonovich, Count), the Emperor's minister of education, Official Nationality rested on three principles: Orthodoxy, autocracy (Orthodoxy, Autocracy, and Nationality), and nationality. Autocracy (absolutism) meant the affirmation and maintenance of the absolute power of the sovereign, which was considered the indispensable foundation of the Russian state; in foreign relations it was transformed into legitimism and a defense of the Vienna settlement. Orthodoxy referred to the official church and its important role in Russia and also to the ultimate source of ethics and ideals that gave meaning to human life and society. Nationality (narodnost) described the particular nature of the Russian people, considered as a mighty and dedicated supporter of its dynasty and government. Whereas Alexander I had never quite abandoned dreams of change, Nicholas I was determined to defend the existing order in his motherland, especially autocracy.

Reign.
      Nicholas I's rule reflected in a striking manner both his character and his principles. The new regime became preeminently one of militarism and bureaucracy. The Emperor surrounded himself with military men, to the extent that late in his reign there were almost no civilians among his immediate assistants. Also, he relied heavily on special emissaries, most of them generals of his suite, who were sent all over Russia on particular assignments to execute immediately the will of the sovereign. Operating outside the regular administrative system, they represented an extension, so to speak, of the monarch's own person. In fact, the entire machinery of government came to be permeated by the military spirit of direct orders, absolute obedience, and precision, at least as far as official reports and appearances were concerned. Corruption and confusion, however, lay immediately behind this facade of discipline and smooth functioning.

      In his conduct of state affairs, Nicholas I often bypassed regular channels and generally resented formal deliberation, consultation, or other procedural delay. The importance of the Committee of Ministers, the State Council, and the Senate decreased in the course of his reign. Instead of making full use of them, the Emperor depended more and more on special bureaucratic devices meant to carry out his intentions promptly while remaining under his immediate and complete control. As one favourite method, Nicholas I made extensive use of ad hoc committees that stood outside the usual state machinery. The committees were typically composed of a handful of the most trusted assistants of the Emperor; because these were few in number, the same men in different combinations formed these committees throughout Nicholas' reign. As a rule, the committees carried on their work in secret, adding further complication and confusion to the already cumbersome administration of the empire. The failure of one committee to perform its task merely led to the formation of another. For example, some nine committees tried to deal with the issue of serfdom during Nicholas' reign.

      The propensities of the autocrat found expression also in the development and the new role of His Majesty's Own Chancery. Organized originally as a bureau to deal with matters that demanded the sovereign's personal participation and to supervise the execution of the Emperor's orders, it acquired five new departments: in 1826 the Second and the Third, to deal with the codification of law and the newly created corps of gendarmes, respectively; in 1828 the Fourth, to manage the charitable and educational institutions under the jurisdiction of the empress dowager Maria; in 1836 the Fifth, to reform the condition of the state peasants (soon replaced by the new Ministry of State Domains); in 1843 the Sixth, to draw an administrative plan for Transcaucasia.

      The departments of the Chancery served Nicholas I as a major means of conducting a personal policy that bypassed the regular state channels. Its Third Department, the political police, acted as the autocrat's main weapon against subversion and revolution and as his principal agency for controlling the behaviour of his subjects and for distributing punishments and rewards among them. Its assigned fields of activity ranged from “all orders and all reports in every case belonging to the higher police” to “reports about all occurrences without exception!” The two successive heads of the Third Department—Count Aleksandr Benckendorff and Prince Aleksey Orlov—probably spent more time with Nicholas than did any of his other assistants; they accompanied him, for instance, on his repeated trips of inspection throughout Russia. During his entire reign the Emperor strove to follow the principle of autocracy—to be a true father of his people concerned with their daily lives, hopes, and fears.

      Yet Nicholas I could do little for them beyond the minutiae. Determined to preserve autocracy, afraid to abolish serfdom, and suspicious of all independent initiative and popular participation, the Emperor and his government could not introduce in their country the much-needed basic reforms. In practice as well as in theory they looked backward. Important developments took place only in a few areas in which change would not threaten the fundamental structure of the Russian Empire. Thus Count Mikhail Speransky (Speransky, Mikhail Mikhaylovich, Graf) codified law, and Count Pavel Kiselev (Kiselyov, Pavel Dmitriyevich) changed and improved the lot of the state peasants; but even limited reforms became impossible after 1848.

Final years.
      Frightened by European revolutions, Nicholas I became completely reactionary. During the last years of the reign the Emperor's once successful foreign policy collapsed, leading to isolation and to the tragedy of the Crimean War. A dauntless champion of legitimism and a virtual hegemony of eastern and central Europe following the revolutions of 1848–49, Nicholas—in part because of his own miscalculations, rigidity, and bluntness—found himself alone fighting the Crescent (the Ottoman Empire), supported by such countries of the Cross as France, Great Britain, and Sardinia.

      Although it is unlikely that Nicholas committed suicide, as several historians have claimed, death did come as liberation to the weary and harassed Russian emperor. An ordinary cold picked up in late February 1855 turned into pneumonia, which the once mighty, but now apparently exhausted, organism refused to fight. To the end the autocrat retained lucidity and dignity. His last words to his heir and his family were: “Now I shall ascend to pray for Russia and for you. After Russia, I loved you above everything else in the world. Serve Russia.” Nicholas I was survived by his wife, Empress Alexandra, and their six children: Emperor Alexander II, the grand dukes Constantine, Nicholas, and Michael, and the grand duchesses Maria and Olga. Another daughter, Grand Duchess Alexandra, had died in 1844.

Nicholas V. Riasanovsky

Additional Reading
The leading full account of Nicholas I and his reign, especially valuable on foreign relations and with numerous documentary appendixes, is Theodor Schiemann, Geschichte Russlands unter Kaiser Nikolaus I, 4 vol. (1904–19, reprinted 1969). W. Bruce Lincoln, Nicholas I, Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias (1978, reprinted 1989), is a valuable scholarly biography with bibliography. A readable popular study is Constantin de Grunwald, Tsar Nicholas I (1954; originally published in French, 1946). Nicholas Valentine Riasanovsky, Nicholas I and Official Nationality in Russia, 1825–1855 (1959, reissued 1969); and A.E. Presniakov, Emperor Nicholas I of Russia: The Apogee of Autocracy, 1825–1865 (1974; originally published in Russian, 1925), with an extended introduction by Riasanovsky, are also useful.

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Universalium. 2010.

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