New Comedy

Greek comedy arising toward the end of the 4th century B.C. that employed stock characters and plots drawn from contemporary bourgeois life, the formulas of which were adopted by later Roman writers for the comic stage. Cf. Middle Comedy, Old Comedy.
[1840-50]

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Greek drama from с 320 BC to the mid-3rd century BC that offers a mildly satiric view of contemporary Athenian society.

Unlike Old Comedy, which parodies public figures and events (see Aristophanes), New Comedy features fictional average citizens in domestic life. The chorus, the representative of forces larger than life, is reduced to a small band of musicians and dancers. Plays usually involve the conventionalized situation of thwarted lovers and contain stock characters. Menander introduced the New Comedy and became its most famous exponent; Plautus and Terence translated its plays for the Roman stage. Elements of New Comedy influenced European drama down to the 18th century.

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▪ Greek drama
      Greek drama from about 320 BC to the mid-3rd century BC that offers a mildly satiric view of contemporary Athenian society, especially in its familiar and domestic aspects. Unlike Old Comedy, which parodied public figures and events, New Comedy features fictional average citizens and has no supernatural or heroic overtones. Thus, the chorus, the representative of forces larger than life, recedes in importance and becomes a small band of musicians and dancers who periodically provide light entertainment.

      The plays commonly deal with the conventionalized situation of thwarted lovers and contain such stock characters as the cunning slave, the wily merchant, the boastful soldier, and the cruel father. One of the lovers is usually a foundling, the discovery of whose true birth and identity makes marriage possible in the end. Although it does not realistically depict contemporary life, New Comedy accurately reflects the disillusioned spirit and moral ambiguity of the bourgeois class of this period.

       Menander introduced the New Comedy in his works about 320 BC and became its most famous exponent, writing in a quiet, witty style. Although most of his plays are lost, Dyscolus (“The Grouch”) survives, along with large parts of Perikeiromenē (“The Shorn Girl”), Epitrepontes (“The Arbitration”), and Samia (“The Girl from Samos”). Menander's plays are mainly known through the works of the Roman dramatists Plautus and Terence, who translated and adapted them, along with other stock plots and characters of Greek New Comedy, for the Roman stage. Revived during the Renaissance, New Comedy influenced European drama down to the 18th century. The commedia erudita, plays from printed texts popular in Italy in the 16th century, and the improvisational commedia dell'arte that flourished in Europe from the 16th to the 18th century used characters and plot conventions that originated in Greek New Comedy. They were also used by Shakespeare and other Elizabethan and Restoration dramatists. Rodgers and Hart's The Boys from Syracuse (1938) is a musical version of Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors, which in turn is based on Plautus's Menaechmi and Amphitruo, which are adaptations of Greek New Comedy. See also comedy.

Additional Reading
R.L. Hunter, The New Comedy of Greece and Rome (1985).

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Universalium. 2010.

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