neural tube defect

any of a group of congenital abnormalities involving the brain and spinal cord, including spina bifida and meningocele, caused by failure of the neural tube to close properly during embryonic development.
[1885-90]

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Congenital defect of the brain or spinal cord from abnormal growth of their precursor, the neural tube (see embryology), usually with spine or skull defects.

The tube may fail to close properly, have parts missing, or have a blockage (see hydrocephalus). In spina bifida, vertebrae are open over the back of the spinal cord, usually at the base. This may not affect function if no further defects (local absence of skin or meninges, protrusion of tissue, defect opening into the spinal cord) exist. The more serious forms can cause paralysis and impair bladder and bowel function. In encephalocele, a meningeal sac containing brain tissue protrudes from the skull. The effects depend on the amount of tissue involved. Adequate folic-acid intake by women of childbearing age reduces the risk of neural tube defects. Early surgery can prevent or minimize disability.

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      any congenital defect of the brain and spinal cord as a result of abnormal development of the neural tube (the precursor of the spinal cord) during early embryonic life, usually accompanied by defects of the vertebral column or skull. In normal development a plaque of nerve tissue forms along the surface of what will become the back of the fetus; this tissue folds into a closed tube that develops into the structures of the central nervous system. Malformations occur because the tube fails to close properly, because parts of it are missing, or because part of the tube is blocked.

      Failure of the tube to close in some degree is the basic defect underlying spina bifida, meningocele, myelocele, and meningomyelocele. Spina bifida is caused by the failure of the vertebrae to form over the back of the spinal cord, leaving the nerve unprotected. It usually occurs in the sacral or lumbar regions at the base of the spine, the final section of the neural tube to close. All the other neural tube defects in this group are particular forms of spina bifida.

      In spina bifida occulta, or hidden spina bifida, the vertebrae fail to completely enclose the spinal cord, but the latter is normal in form and is covered by the skin of the back. This form of the defect has no effect on body functions and may go undetected for life.

      In more serious forms of spina bifida, part of the spinal cord is left uncovered by the skin or actually protrudes from the spinal column. In myelocele, the spinal cord is exposed so that nerve tissue lies exposed on the surface of the back without even a covering of skin or of the meninges, the membranous tissue surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Meningocele occurs when these meninges protrude through the vertebral defect, forming a fluid-filled sac. Meningomyelocele is a compound defect in which the protruding sac contains some nervous tissue as well. If any of these defects communicate with the central canal of the spinal cord, the prefix syringo- is added to the name; hence, a syringomyelocele is an open defect containing nerve tissue and opening into the spinal cord.

      Children born with the more serious forms of spina bifida experience paralysis in those parts of the body below the site involved. The legs may be completely paralyzed, and bladder and bowel functions may be absent or impaired. Spina bifida defects can be treated surgically early in life; success is greatest with meningocele, because paraplegia or other disabilities associated with myelocele can complicate therapy.

      Another form of open neural tube defect, encephalocele, occurs when a meningeal sac containing brain tissue protrudes from the skull. The outlook for affected individuals depends on the amount of nervous tissue involved.

       hydrocephalus, an accumulation of fluid within the brain, occurs when normal passages for the cerebrospinal fluid that fills the neural tube are partially or completely blocked. The brain and skull are greatly enlarged because of the fluid pressure. Hydrocephalus occurs in one or two of every 1,000 live births and was routinely fatal until surgical techniques for shunting the excess fluid out of the central nervous system were developed; today it need not cause any intellectual impairment if recognized and treated promptly.

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Universalium. 2010.

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