neo-Hegelianism

neo-Hegelian, n., adj.
/nee'oh hay gay"lee euh niz'euhm, -hi jee"-/, n. Philos.
Hegelianism as modified by various philosophers of the latter half of the 19th century.
[1915-20]

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      the doctrines of an idealist school of philosophers that was prominent in Great Britain and in the United States between 1870 and 1920. The name is also sometimes applied to cover other philosophies of the period that were Hegelian in inspiration—for instance, those of Benedetto Croce and of Giovanni Gentile. Neo-Hegelianism in Great Britain developed originally as a natural sequel to the semipopular work of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Thomas Carlyle. Its exponents sought to give philosophical expression to a widely felt antipathy to the prevailing materialism and utilitarianism and turned to the writings of G.W.F. Hegel and the German school as containing penetrating, if oracular, statements of an alternative view.

      The British Neo-Hegelians—notably T.H. Green (1836–82), Edward Caird (1835–1908), and F.H. Bradley (1846–1924)—were opposed to materialism and to naturalism in metaphysics; to analyses of consciousness in terms of sensation and of the association of ideas in theory of knowledge; to psychologism and to formalism in logic; and to the “greatest happiness” principle as well as to the doctrine of duty for duty's sake in ethics. In politics they dissociated themselves from the prevailing individualism and tended to look on the state as a living community rather than a mutual-benefit society. Their attitude toward religion was ambiguous; for, though they were in general sympathetic to religious claims, they made no secret of the fact that they could not accept them at their face value. Much of the popular attraction of their philosophy, indeed, sprang from its seeming to provide a rational alternative to the religious beliefs that were increasingly difficult to reconcile with new scientific knowledge and the theory of evolution; and one reason for its decline may have been that, as religious difficulties ceased to be a central preoccupation, less need was felt of such a substitute for religion as this philosophy offered.

      Neo-Hegelianism in the United States sprang from the work of the Boston Transcendentalists, whose knowledge of German philosophy was, however, mostly secondhand; it owed much of its advance to the efforts of William Torrey Harris (Harris, William Torrey) (1835–1909) and to the Journal of Speculative Philosophy, which he founded in 1867. Its most distinguished and determined proponent was Josiah Royce (Royce, Josiah) (1855–1916), though Royce's idealism, with the special place that it assigned to the will, was closer to the ideas of Johann Gottlieb Fichte than to those of Hegel himself. Royce's distinguished contemporaries Charles Sanders Peirce (Peirce, Charles Sanders) and William James (James, William) both repudiated his metaphysics; yet Peirce had described himself as an “idealist” in his early life, and even James had experienced the Hegelian influence to some extent. The same was true of James's successor John Dewey (Dewey, John), who began life as a Hegelian and, despite his antipathy to absolutes, retained certain Hegelian features in his thought, notably a tendency to denounce abstractions and a reserved attitude toward the claims of formal logicians.

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Universalium. 2010.

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