mustard family

the plant family Cruciferae (or Brassicaceae), characterized by herbaceous plants having alternate leaves, acrid or pungent juice, clusters of four-petaled flowers, and fruit in the form of a two-parted capsule, and including broccoli, cabbage, candytuft, cauliflower, cress, mustard, radish, sweet alyssum, turnip, and wallflower.

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Family Brassicaceae (or Cruciferae), composed of 350 genera of mostly herbaceous plants with peppery-flavored leaves.

The pungent seeds of some species lead the spice trade in volume traded. Mustard flowers take the form of a Greek cross, with four petals, usually white, yellow, or lavender, and an equal number of sepals. The seeds are produced in podlike fruits. Members of the mustard family include many plants of economic importance that have been extensively altered and domesticated by humans. The most important genus is Brassica (see brassica); turnips, radishes, rutabagas, and many ornamental plants are also members of the family. As a spice, mustard is sold in seed, powder, or paste form.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mustard family — noun a large family of plants with four petaled flowers; includes mustards, cabbages, broccoli, turnips, cresses, and their many relatives • Syn: ↑Cruciferae, ↑family Cruciferae, ↑Brassicaceae, ↑family Brassicaceae • Derivationally related forms …   Useful english dictionary

  • mustard — /mus teuhrd/, n. 1. a pungent powder or paste prepared from the seed of the mustard plant, used as a food seasoning or condiment, and medicinally in plasters, poultices, etc. 2. any of various acrid or pungent plants, esp. of the genus Brassica,… …   Universalium

  • mustard — 1. The dried ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white m.) and B. nigra (black m.) (family Cruciferae). 2. SYN: m. gas. [O.Fr. moustarde, fr. L. mustum, must] black m. the dried ripe seed of Brassica nigra or of B. juncea; it is the source of allyl… …   Medical dictionary

  • Mustard — William T., Canadian thoracic surgeon, 1914–1987. See M. operation, M. procedure. * * * mus·tard məs tərd n 1) a pungent yellow condiment consisting of the pulverized seeds of the black mustard or sometimes the white mustard either dry or made… …   Medical dictionary

  • family — /fam euh lee, fam lee/, n., pl. families, adj. n. 1. parents and their children, considered as a group, whether dwelling together or not. 2. the children of one person or one couple collectively: We want a large family. 3. the spouse and children …   Universalium

  • mustard — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French mustarde, from must must, from Latin mustum Date: 13th century 1. a. a pungent yellow powder of the seeds of any of several common mustards (Brassica hirta, B. nigra, or B. juncea) used as a… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • family Brassicaceae — noun a large family of plants with four petaled flowers; includes mustards, cabbages, broccoli, turnips, cresses, and their many relatives • Syn: ↑Cruciferae, ↑family Cruciferae, ↑Brassicaceae, ↑mustard family • Derivationally related forms:… …   Useful english dictionary

  • family Cruciferae — noun a large family of plants with four petaled flowers; includes mustards, cabbages, broccoli, turnips, cresses, and their many relatives • Syn: ↑Cruciferae, ↑Brassicaceae, ↑family Brassicaceae, ↑mustard family • Derivationally related forms:… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Mustard (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome — All of the genetic information contained in Arabidopsis thaliana, a plant belonging to the mustard family. The genomes of particular nonhuman organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana have been studied for a number of reasons including the need to… …   Medical dictionary

  • Mustard oil — The term mustard oil is used for three different oils that are made from mustard seeds: A fatty vegetable oil resulting from pressing the seeds, An essential oil resulting from grinding the seeds, mixing them with water, and extracting the… …   Wikipedia

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